Graduate survey shows China graduate student application decline

University maintains its trends, sees small uptick in India graduate applications

Many of the Engineering Schools’ classes occur in Thornton Hall, above.



“Our fluctuations vary so much from year to year from applicants for each of these countries,” Norris said in an email. “When you see an increase [in applicants] from one country, often that means faculty have established research collaboration in that country.”

The Council of Graduate Services released the results of its 2014 International Graduate Admissions Survey this past week, synthesizing data involving the application, admission and enrollment of international students pursuing graduate schooling in the United States.

The study shows a 7 percent increase in the number of international applicants from 2013 to 2014.

“The 7 percent increase in applications from prospective international students to U.S. graduate schools in 2014 is substantially higher than the 2 percent increase in 2013,” the study said. “[These figures are more] analogous to rates of increase in applications between 2006 and 2012.”

According to the study, physical and earth sciences had a 16 percent increase in international applications, and engineering had a 14 percent increase, with arts and humanities increasing by only 3 percent and life sciences decreasing by 6 percent.

Pamela Norris, associate dean for research and graduate programs at the Engineering School, said she did not see any major trends in her reports on international applications at the University.

“Our fluctuations vary so much from year to year from applicants for each of these countries,” Norris said in an email. “When you see an increase [in applicants] from one country, often that means faculty have established research collaboration in that country.”

China —the nation most prospective international students apply from — saw a decline in applications compared to recent years, regardless of the 7 percent overall increase in international student applications, according to the CGS study. Meanwhile, the survey showed an increase in the number of applicants from India.

“This is of particular concern given the fact that prospective students from India have not exhibited large and sustained year-to-year increases in applications in the same way that prospective students from China have,” the study said. “Although China remains the largest country of origin for international graduate students in the United States, continued declines in applications from prospective students from China could ultimately begin to lead to decreases in overall applications from international students to U.S. graduate schools.”

Norris also commented on region-specific applicants at the University.

“Our percentage applications from China has held at the levels seen in 2011 and 2012 and there has been a slight increase in applications from India,” Norris said.

In a recent press release by put out by the group, CGS President Deborah W. Stewart addressed the importance of recruiting international students to graduate programs.

“Historically, our ability to recruit the best and brightest international graduate students has enabled the U.S. to become a leader in ground-breaking research and innovations,” Stewart said in the press release. “International students stimulate the U.S. economy and research enterprise in many important ways, and we must develop policies that encourage strong, stable growth in international graduate applications and enrollments.”


Published April 20, 2014 in News





The Cavalier Daily welcomes thoughtful, respectful and relevant comments that contribute to a public dialogue. In order to maintain a high level of discourse, all comments must be approved by our moderator. For more information, view our full comment policy.

Comments powered by Disqus

Powered by powered by SNworks Solutions by The State News