Glynn Key, alumna, Seven and former BOV member dies suddenly

University leaders say Key will be missed

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Alumna Glynn D. Key, a member of the Seven Society and former University Board of Visitors member, passed away suddenly at her home in Philadelphia Nov. 20. Key was 50 years old.

At the time of her death, Key served as general counsel to General Electric and oversaw multiple global development projects. Prior to joining GE, Key was a partner at renowned legal firm WilmerHale and served as counselor to Secretary Bruce Babbitt in the U.S. Department of the Interior during the Clinton administration from 1993-96.

"Glynn Key was a passionate advocate for higher education and understood its transformative power in shaping future citizen leaders. Her dedication to the University of Virginia and the Commonwealth spanned many decades, and she touched the lives of many students, faculty, staff and fellow alumni. We extend our deepest condolences to her family," Rector George Keith Martin said.

Key received a Bachelors of Arts degree from the University in 1986 and a Juris Doctor in 1989. Key was a member of the Seven Society, IMP Society, Raven Society, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Chair of the Honor Committee, a Jefferson Scholar and Lawn resident.

Key was appointed to the Board of Visitors in 2004, where she acted as chair of the Educational Policy Committee until 2012.

"I knew Glynn Key as a thoughtful, concerned Board member who always cared about the students' welfare,” University President Teresa Sullivan said in an email. “She remembered her own undergraduate days, when she was an outstanding student leader, and she sought to provide comparable leadership opportunities for today's students. She was also an articulate advocate for the Honor Code. I will personally miss her wise counsel."

Key also served on the Governing Board of the Miller Center for Public Affairs from 2003 until her death.

“Glynn was impressive — intelligent, accomplished and gracious,” Gerald L. Baliles, director and CEO of the Miller Center, said in an email. “Her bearing was one of grace and quiet dignity, but when she spoke, people listened. Above all, however, she was a friend who will be sorely missed across Grounds, especially at the Miller Center.”

Key was also a member of the advisory board for the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business’ Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership, as well as the board of trustees of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation.

"Glynn Key was a passionate advocate for higher education and understood its transformative power in shaping future citizen leaders,” Rector George Keith Martin said in an email. “Her dedication to the University of Virginia and the Commonwealth spanned many decades, and she touched the lives of many students, faculty, staff and fellow alumni. We extend our deepest condolences to her family."

An educational scholarship, The Glynn D. Key Fund, was set up at the University in Key's honor.

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