Runners bike, eat donuts to support bike shop that was robbed

Proceeds donated to Charlottesville Community Bikes

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Doughnut Duo runners were charged $10 for online entries or $15 at the race in order to participate. All participants were required to eat four doughnuts between the first and second mile. Runners could compete individually or as part of a relay group.

Emma Lewis | Cavalier Daily

In an effort to raise funds for Charlottesville Community Bikes, five students in the Commerce School class Project Management organized Doughnut Duo, a race involving eating doughnuts while running two miles.

All the students involved in organizing the run were eager to help the bike shop, a nonprofit that functions primarily off of donations and volunteers and was robbed a few weeks previously, said Claire D’Alessio, one of the planners.

“It’s a cause that’s very important to us,” the third-year Commerce student said.

The group started with $500 for their project, but D’Alessio said the group hoped to donate as much of that as possible to the bike shop.

“The idea is [to] have a return, so we should make more money than we spend,” D’Alessio said.

Runners were charged $10 for online entries or $15 at the race in order to participate. All participants were required to eat four doughnuts between the first and second mile. Runners could compete individually or as part of a relay group.

The first-place prize was a bike provided by the shop, while second and third place took home various paraphernalia from Ragged Mountain Running Shop.

One of the 20 runners in the event, Billy Burgess, attended Doughnut Duo to support a friend and to participate in a non-traditional race.

“It's a good event, the doughnut adds a nice flair – definitely changes things,” said Burgess, a member of the University Triathlon Team. “I’m really excited about it. I love how there’s a relay option and an individual option.”

Robbie Courter, a second year Engineering student and also a Triathlon Team member, won the race.

“Emotionally it feels great. Physically, it’s awful,” Courter said. “I feel like I’m about to keel over in a second.”

The five Commerce students who put on the race were D’Alessio, fourth-year Cameron Lee, and third years Alex Wolz, Alex Marchetti and Emmet Saulnier.

The aim of the project management class, taught by Commerce Prof. Jason Williamson, is to combine theoretical knowledge with the practical skills needed for the impactful management of projects.

Read this article translated into Chinese here

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