Future, Young Thug get down and dirty with ‘Super Slimey’

Mixtape represents snapshot of each of their careers

ae-YoungThug-CourtesyWikimediaCommons

“Super Slimey” is another worthy record to add to the incredible run of releases by both artists. 

Courtesy Wikimedia Commons | Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

When two rap monoliths come together for a collaborative project, all too often the final product is released amidst a sea of anticipatory fervor and endless fan hype. Such was not the case with Future and Young Thug’s “Super Slimey,” which dropped without warning last Friday. Even so, the starpower of the artists quickly propelled the mixtape up charts across the globe, serving as a cherry on top to an eventful 2017 for both rappers.

For Future, the collaboration is his first release in eight months, which is bit of a break for the rap machine known for grinding out hit after hit. But after back-to-back chart-topping albums with “FUTURE” and “HNDRXX” and the quadruple platinum single “Mask Off,” the break was certainly well earned. 

Similarly, Young Thug has released two projects this year and appeared on many more songs for other A-listers, including Drake, Camila Cabello, Calvin Harris, DJ Khaled and many more. In the process, Young Thug cemented his unique rap platform, utilizing his eccentric style to turn many heads.

Besides their busy years, Future and Young Thug share a number of other similarities. Both are established “mumble rappers,” sacrificing word articulation for murky tones and sinister song atmospheres. Both are also from Atlanta and part of the recent explosion of Atlanta rap which includes names such as Migos, 21 Savage and Lil Yachty. Despite these similarities, however, the two have rarely collaborated — until now.

“Super Slimey” is a caricature of both artists’ careers, playing to their strengths as they bombard listeners with song after song of high-octane trap music. The mixtape features the whole palette of Future and Young Thug staples, including Future’s almost unintelligible bars, Thug’s unhinged vocal contortion and extremely bass-heavy production — the mixtape is a perfect addition to any workout playlist. 

Immediately evident is the electric chemistry between the rappers. Although the two are stylistically similar, the differences they do have effectively stand out and complement one another. In “Patek Water,” Future serves up a braggadocious hook flanked by unique ad-libs from Thug, creating a very energetic ambiance. The song also features Migos’ Offset, who rounds the song off with an aggressive verse.

Thematically, the pair sticks with what has worked for them before. For example, there are constant reminders of their wealth in this project. This plays into the grander rags-to-riches narrative which has been instrumental to both their careers. Other related motifs in the mixtape include drugs, drug hustling, gang life, violence and beautiful women.

Despite all this, “Super Slimey” remains thematically stagnant, representing a look back at each of the rappers’ careers instead of a next step. Rarely do the songs venture into themes of real substance, while the topics they do cover are largely relatable only for drug dealers or the one percent. Many of the songs also sound very similar to one another, consisting of fast tempos, heavy use of bass and snares and unintelligible line after unintelligible line. 

But Future and Young Thug have stuck to this mold for their entire careers. In the end, “Super Slimey” is another worthy record to add to the incredible run of releases by both artists. The word “slimy” is often synonymous with words such as immoral or dishonest. Yet both artists are utterly confident and in the prime of their careers, proving that to them, slime isn’t an insult, but a lifestyle.

related stories