The Cavalier Daily
Serving the University Community Since 1890

Life


Life

Odds and Ends

Far East enters Newcomb It's almost the weekend and that means shelving your meal plan for more exciting local fare. Even if your taste buds are dancing for one of the Downtown Mall's fancy cafes or the Corner's charming eateries, the cost of weekend eating excursions can be rough on the college budget. In order to quench your craving for take-out this weekend, make your way over to the Newcomb Hall Ballroom tomorrow for Chinafest 2001 - a taste of the Far East. Beginning at 1 p.m., the Chinese Student Association and the Hong Kong Student Association will present a celebration of Chinese culture and cuisine. Featured booths include Chinese painting, vegetable carving, name translations and calligraphy. &nbsp Related Links Hong Kong Student Association Web site Chinese Student Association Web site Performances of traditional Asian dancing, kung fu, Chinese yo-yo and Lion Dances begin at 2 p.m. These two groups and its members help link the University to the Asian culture. "This is the first year that we are incorporating the local Chinese schools in Charlottesville," said Su-Cha Kang, a fourth-year Engineering student and CSA president.


Life

Run for Your Life

Certain memories of the University last long after graduation: the Lawn, the Rotunda, streaking the Lawn getting rotund from eating dining hall food. But now students have another memory to take with them down the road of life.


Life

The great Gillen giveaway

W e all recall what happened on Jan. 31. Well, most of us do at least. For those of you who tuned in to "Temptation Island" instead, I'll fill you in.


Life

Odds and Ends

All aboard at "Valentine's Central" Last minute shoppers swarmed the University bookstore yesterday afternoon in search of all gifts expressing love and devotion for Valentine's Day. While some ventured off Grounds in search of the perfect present, the bookstore seemed most convenient for many students. "Valentine's Central" is that area of the bookstore awash in candles, picture frames and stuffed animals. "I'm just here to browse and see what I can pick up," first-year College student Vivek Taneja said. Taneja had already picked up some fruit as gifts for his friends but admitted "fruit doesn't really cut it." His gift quest continued, but not for traditional fare such as the standard teddy bear.


Life

100 Years of Fortitude

Julian Bond sat quietly sipping his Frappuccino as people milled around or flipped through magazines in the cafe at Barnes and Noble bookstore. Some of these patrons eyed the NAACP chairman and University professor in the few minutes before his scheduled book signing and discussion of "Lift Every Voice and Sing: A Celebration of the Negro National Anthem, 100 Years, 100 Voices." In celebration of the Black National Anthem centennial, Bond and co-editor Sandra Wilson compiled 100 essays by artists, politicians and educators reflecting on their personal experiences with the song.


Life

Candies sweeten holiday with timeless messages

February 14, synonymous with love, romance and, of course, sweets, would not be complete without a little sugar and a romantic word or two on a candy conversation heart. For generations, the message "Be Mine" stamped on a tiny heart-shaped candy wafer has made the perfect Valentine. "Be Good," "Kiss Me" and "Sweet Talk" are just a few of the other Valentine's Day sayings traded by elementary school students, blushing would-be couples and friends everywhere to make the day a bit sweeter. These tasty little Valentines are the product of the New England Confectionary Company, or NECCO, which started making the original "Motto Hearts" in 1886. "This is a nostalgia candy.


Life

Odds and Ends

Final hours The excitement level was high outside U-Hall last night, as television and radio station crews interviewed students camped out for tickets to the Duke-Virginia game, which tips off at 7 p.m.


Life

Be Mine Online

Today, more than any other day of the year, hearts are touched for the first time or possibly broken forever, sparks fly and rejections consume the lives of University students.


Life

A Local Thriller

It's easy to forget that John Grisham is a celebrity. Dressed in blue jeans and a sports jacket, his chin grazed with a five o'clock shadow, he seems like any other guy with a Southern accent. "Grab a seat.


Life

Odds and Ends

Hooville's Long Wait Welcome to Hooville, a campout complete with multi-colored tents, sleeping bags, blankets, munchies and lounge chairs. For a handful of University basketball fans, yesterday was Day 3 of the campout for Wednesday's game against Duke. Sprawled out on a red plaid blanket on the floor of University Hall's lobby, second-year College student Luca Sciullo saved a space for the Wig Men, a group of 12 student fans who wear orange and blue wigs to basketball games. "We're hoping to get seats opposite of the [Pep] Band," Sciullo said.


Life

Odds and Ends

Roughing it at U-Hall Most students like to write their papers in the quiet of the library or in the comfort of their rooms. But yesterday, Mark Straub, a first-year College student, chose a different place - the lobby of University Hall. Straub, who leads the all first-year Hoos in the Hall, is one of a handful of students who camped out five days in advance for the basketball game against Duke this Wednesday. He wasn't the first to arrive, though.


Life

Stuffed Up in a Hotel Room

Instead of spending Spring Break soaking up sun on an exotic beach, some University students are keeping their fingers crossed, hoping they can spend their week secluded in a hotel room with a runny nose and a cough. Why would perfectly sane students prefer having a cold for five days to taking a vacation?


Life

Pretty in Pink

The most coveted merchandise in the male politico fashion realm sits just to the left of the door at Eljo's clothing store on the Corner. There, on a 4-foot-high rack, one can find the famous U.Va.