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Life


Life

Odds and Ends

The show must go on First Year Players hit a bump in the road this week when first-year College student Erin Addis-Liesler, who plays the lead character Sandy in FYP's version of "Grease," broke her foot.


Life

Odds and Ends

Gus-sed out Christmas. Easter. Valentine's Day. Some sacred events come only once a year, and, thankfully, so does the annual Gus Burger Eating Contest.


Life

Local Virginia wineries provide afternoon to be savored

This is the third in a weekly series of articles on road trips within reasonable reach of the University. A Drinking Song Wine comes in at the mouth And love comes in at the eye; That's all we shall know for truth Before we grow old and die. I lift the glass to my mouth, I look at you, and I sigh. --W.B.


Life

Odds and Ends

Getting Greed-y This fall it was "Jeopardy." Now, it's time for "Greed." Thursday, the new trivia game show "Greed" made an appearance on Grounds to recruit student contestants. Second-year College student Jen Stamey was one of the University finalists selected for the show.


Life

Homer's Odyssey brings him to Lawn

He sits on the south end of the Lawn and overlooks students on their trek to class. With a chalked advertisement for the University Transit Service streaked across his marble and granite base and occasional use as a Frisbee golf target, he is best known for his role in the streaking tradition. He is Homer.


Life

En route to cordless bliss

This week I wanted to bring to your attention an extremely grave situation that in the near future could affect every last one of us.


Life

Odds and Ends

Race Line The voice of the Reverend Al Sharpton came over the University's phone lines Friday with an unexpected question: is race really an issue of concern at the University? Though "The Reverend" was actually Ryan Coleman-Ferebee, director of communications for Brothers United Celebrating Knowledge and Success, his inquiry was met with a resounding yes from the audience at Reflection on Complexion, an open forum for race discussions sponsored by B.U.C.K.S. The event, which marked the culmination of B.U.C.K.S's outreach week, was held in Old Cabell Hall with about 400 people in attendance. A student-created short film opened the event and introduced the format of the discussion: Race Line, which parodied the popular call-in advice show "Love Line." Questions concerned the relevance of the diversity issue on college campuses, affirmative action and non-native English speakers serving on juries. While some panelists were opposed to using race as a factor in admissions, most were in favor of some form of affirmative action. There was more contention over the issue of U.S.


Life

Birthday suits on the Lawn

Streaking is such a pervasive part of the University experience that one often wonders if perhaps Jefferson himself didn't make that notorious sprint down the Lawn while Madison or Washington served as lookouts for the cops. Evidence conflicts as to exactly when the tradition got started - in fact, no one appears to know for certain.


Life

Odds and Ends

Reflecting on race "Can I call you 'nigga" a flyer asks. Brothers United Celebrating Knowledge and Success hope the shock-value of their flyers will encourage anyone enraged or intrigued by racial commentary to attend Reflection on Complexion, an open forum for race discussions today at 8 p.m.


Life

Odds and Ends

Dawgy style The first sign of spring has arrived. And, no, it wasn't the sighting of a robin or the budding of daffodils that signaled the start of this new season. Dawg Days at the Castle have begun. Every Thursday from 11 a.m.


Life

Natural Bridge awes with beauty, history

This is the second in a weekly series of articles on road trips within reasonable reach of the University. George Washington carved his initials in it, Thomas Jefferson once owned it, and a Virginia county takes its name after it.


Life

Odds and Ends

Personal issues Wednesday marks the Mosaic House spring forum, which will concentrate on religious issues throughout the University. "We want to take this kind of taboo subject away from closed-mindedness and to make people feel more comfortable talking about it," said Tracy D'Souza, second-year College student and forum planner. Panelists will include members from groups such as Inter-Varsity Christians and Hillel, as well as individuals holding atheistic and Catholic beliefs. "We wanted to focus on when you come to the University ... how practicing religion changes if it does change," she said. The forum will take place in Maury Auditorium at 7:00 p.m.