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Life

Odds and Ends

And the winner is ... Thanks to the Third-Year Council and Peace Frogs travel agency, third-year students Quincy Kolb and Sarah Witt spent this weekend in New Orleans. Directly after winning the trip Thursday night, the two students were whisked away in a limousine to pack their bags. After Kolb's raffle ticket was drawn, she chose Witt to accompany her on the all-expenses paid trip. They were given accommodations in a hotel in Charlottesville to anticipate their Friday morning flight to Creole Country. Organizers of the event said that 60 other prizes were awarded in addition to the trip. But the real winner was United Support: The Community Foundation Against Domestic Violence and Abuse, which received all $2,600 raised at the event. "We decided United Support would be our best choice because they are an up-and-coming charity in Charlottesville," Third-Year Council member Tony Rettig said.


Life

Odds and Ends

Comparing notes Yesterday, for the first time in history, four types of collating devices were assembled in the same room.


Life

Disco dancer grooves out of Halloween spirit

Once upon a time I loved Halloween. It wasn't just the candy that appealed to me (though I admit I did get quite excited at the prospect of Reese's Peanut Butter Cups that were banned from my house the other 364 days of the year). It was the act of donning a costume and raising myself to the rank of princess or president or embodying my fanciful heroes like Smurfette or Cinderella, or even crossing the boundaries of species and becoming a cat or a butterfly that I adored.


Life

Connecting through culture

Archilochus, a Greek lyricist, once wrote that "the fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing." This quote provided inspiration and a central concept for the founders of The Hedgehog Review, a new cultural analysis journal at the University that strives to connect the discussion of cultural problems in scholarly circles to the world outside academia. "Our desire is to put out a journal that addresses many of the most important issues of the day, but in a way that is accessible to intelligent and well-educated people who are non-specialists," said James Davison Hunter, William R.


Life

CavsCare Symposium to address local homelessness

A sign hanging in Eugene Mitchell's home reads, "Let your failures motivate you to become more diligent and to achieve victory." For Mitchell, a former homeless drug addict, the fact that he has a wall to hang a sign is just as motivating as the powerful message. "About six years [ago] I got involved in crack cocaine and it took me out," Mitchell said. The struggle with addiction led Mitchell down a path of hunger and homelessness, which ended when he decided to become part of the solution instead of the problem. "You need to realize that feeling sorry for yourself don't do no good," he said.


Life

Odds and Ends

Burn, baby burn Running enthusiasts looking to get in touch with nature participated in the Blue Ridge Burn-10K Saturday morning. The 6.2-mile race was organized by Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine. Although no ghosts or goblins were seen, a few runners came in costume, including a runaway bride and a red devil. Winding up and down the forest of Walnut Creek Park, most runners found the 6.2-mile all-terrain course challenging. For a few unlucky individuals, roots and rocks were unavoidable, leading to some nasty spills.


Life

Urban legend haunts Lefevre dorm residents

At this time of year, most first-year students have settled into their new surroundings. Gone are the stresses of unpacking, meeting hall-mates and navigating unfamiliar territory.


Life

Odds and Ends

Smashing pumpkins Rather than merely celebrating Halloween Friday and Saturday nights, University Union hopes to convince students to head to the Ruffner parking lot Sunday afternoon from noon to 4 p.m.


Life

Faculty spotlight Tolson, black artists

Melvin Tolson, a poet who wrote during the turbulent Civil Rights Movement, challenged the traditional view of black art as a medium for social change by writing poetry that was not confined to a solitary theme.