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Students seek new governing body for fraternities, sororities

The Office of the Dean of Students is coordinating an effort to create a fourth governing council for fraternities and sororities. The proposed new council is an attempt to accommodate those fraternities and sororities that do not necessarily fall under existing fraternal councils, Asst.


News

Officials plan to promote safety

Following two recent attacks near Grounds, members of the University community said they are working together to create a safer living environment and to prevent further sexual assaults. An armed burglary and rape occurred Thursday in the Venable neighborhood and an attempted sexual assault took place Monday in Azalea Park (see related stories, A1). While a suspect was arrested in connection with Monday's attack, last Thursday's assailant remains at large. Leonard Sandridge, executive vice president and chief financial officer, said the University is continuing its efforts to prevent attacks.


News

College anticipates long-awaited media studies major

Budding journalists, filmmakers, television producers and other media buffs at the University soon may find a new home in a proposed interdisciplinary major, media studies, which might be implemented as early as the fall of 2001 or 2002. While the media studies degree still has a few hurdles to clear before it becomes a full-fledged major, it has picked up some momentum from the hiring of Director Johanna Drucker last spring. Plans for the program have been in the works since 1995, and while the major will not be official until 2001 or 2002, the core classes may be available in the fall of 2000. By that timetable, interested students who are currently first and second years will be able to major in media studies.


News

University readies for Y2K bug

Students need not worry about the ISIS man going on the fritz January 1, 2000. University computing officials say computers around Grounds, including the Integrated Student Information System computers, are ready to handle the Year 2000 problem. The Y2K problem became a major worry because many computers are programmed to know only the last two digits of a given year. Therefore, some computers recognize the year 2000 as 1900, and massive complications could arise when the new year begins. "We are completing a multi-year preparation for the Y2K event," said Dr. Robert Reynolds, interim director of information technology and vice provost for the Health Sciences Center.


News

E-School updates labs, software, curriculum

University computing facilities just received a much-needed software upgrade to serve student needs and enhance the computer science curriculum. This month, Information Technology and Communication installed mainly Microsoft Office 2000 and Visual Studio 6.0. The University previously used Microsoft Office 97-Professional Edition before making the upgrade this summer, said Tony Townsend, who is part of ITC's Computing Support Services.


News

Student groups begin move into new offices

Members of student organizations formerly housed in Peabody Hall will spend their first days on Grounds unpacking boxes, setting up computers and decorating walls-and that's just in their office space. This week, about a dozen student organizations will move into new office spaces around Grounds due to their eviction last spring from Peabody Hall.


News

Turkey quake strands some U.Va. students

Following the devastating Aug. 17 earthquake in Turkey that claimed over 13,000 lives and crippled the Turkish economy, University officials are making an effort to aide Turkish international students and ensure their safe return to Grounds. Asst.


News

Class of 2003 Acceptances Exceed Expectations

With 25 more first-year students than planned moving in this weekend, University administrators said they are hoping that the class size will gradually decrease over the next few months. "We are talking to students now who are not coming," Dean of Admissions John A.


News

Armed man rapes student in home

Cavalier Daily News Editors The University is offering a $5,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of an unidentified man who entered the apartment of a University student at about 5 a.m.


News

Lawyers work on finalizing

University lawyers and Qatari officials are still working out the kinks in the University's contract to help create a satellite campus in Qatar.


News

University to abide by Higher Education Act

University President John T. Casteen III recently released a letter to all incoming students and their parents concerning the University's new notification policy for when students abuse alcohol or violate laws concerning alcohol consumption. "We believe that the effect [on students] will be minimal because experience this year has been that both students and organizations, fraternities for example, have taken action to reduce the number of cases in which serious hazard to health or safety occurs to implement educational programs to discourage chronic abuse," Casteen said. Parents will be notified when "the Office of the Dean of Students receives notification from law enforcement officials that a University of Virginia student under the age of 21 has been arrested during an academic session for a drug or alcohol related violation," the parental notification policy reads. Further, "when there is reason to believe that a student's health and well being are in jeopardy, a professional staff member in the Office of the Dean of Students will notify a parent or guardian," the policy states. The notification policy "formalizes our current practice," Asst.


News

StudCo starts year by buying cable TV for their office

Next time you desperately need to watch "Beverly Hills 90210," don't run home. Just stop by the Student Council office, relax and enjoy. Student Council members had cable television installed in their workroom last week, sparking a swift reaction from all over the University community, including President John T.


News

Alderman Library receives $500,000 block grant

Alderman Library's Special Collections Department and the Electronic Text Center received a $500,000 grant to fund the second phase of their Early American Fiction digitalization project Friday. The project is designed to take advantage of the University's compilation of early American literature. "I think that U.