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News

New poll confirms political apathy

College-age people are less trusting of politicians and less engaged in politics than are people over 25, according to a report released Monday by political awareness group Project Vote Smart. Project Vote Smart, a non-partisan political research group, surveyed respondents divided into a group of 18- to 25-year-olds and a group of people over 25. Only 22 percent of the younger group said they pay "a lot" of attention to national affairs, versus 37 percent of the older group.


News

FSC to house unique Greek groups

The recent formation of a new umbrella organization for Greek societies has opened doors for some unique prospective sororities and fraternities. The Fraternity and Sorority Council, a new Contracted Independent Organization, was granted CIO status last Tuesday by Student Council.


News

Administrators present research funding options

Vice President and Provost Gene D. Block and Assoc. Provost for Management Kathrine Reed spoke to the General Faculty Council Monday afternoon about the resources general faculty can obtain for research and salaries between funding contracts.


News

Campaign chalks up $947 million

According to the latest numbers, the University's Capital Campaign has raised $947 million and is now within nearly 5 percent of its $1 billion goal. There is still over a year left in the Campaign, and fundraising is expected to surpass $1 billion by December, but officials said the Campaign will not be winding down as it nears its goal.


News

Council representatives request UJC input in parental notification

Dean of Students Penny Rue met with four Student Council representatives yesterday to discuss whether to include the University Judiciary Committee in the parental notification process. A Student Council resolution, passed unanimously last March, called for students to have a hand in the implementation of the Parental Notification Policy, which allows administrators to contact a student's parents if he or she has a consistent pattern of alcohol abuse.


News

Proposal allows fourth years to design course

Fourth-year students may soon be able to design their own course by attending lectures and performances for class credit, according to a proposal now being discussed by the Fourth-Year Class Trustees. Only in the proposal stage, some trustees said they envision a four-credit course created individually by students and consisting of one professor-led discussion per week.


News

City fights to keep local homeowners

(This is the first in a three part series about Charlottesville's efforts to attract middle-income residents.) Charlottesville officials are worried that too many single-family homes are being converted into rental units for students, driving away middle-income residents who are a valuable asset to the city. The past 10 years have shown a slight decline in owner-occupied homes in Charlottesville -- this despite an overall increase in the total housing units. In an effort to keep its permanent residents, City Council has been trying to improve residential parking near the University and give residents other incentives to stay in the city. The problem begins as single family homes in areas near Grounds get bought up quickly by landlords, who convert them into rental property for students, Charlottesville Vice Mayor Meredith Richards said. "We have lost a lot of home ownership," Richards said. Landlords who rent apartments to students can pay more than market value for available homes -- more than middle-income residents can pay.


News

Thieves steal 6,000 newspapers at U. Missouri

The staff of the University of Missouri's student newspaper, The Maneater, were dismayed to discover last Tuesday morning that several thousand copies of their paper had been stolen. Staff members discovered that the papers were missing upon arriving at The Maneater's central office in Brady Commons, which is the paper's main distribution center. Paul Wilson, editor-in-chief of The Maneater, said the papers were taken from the office sometime early last Tuesday morning. Students noticed other papers, distributed at various sites around campus, were missing also. "I believe that the others were taken sometime during the weekend," Wilson said.


News

Faculty address teaching, research at Friday retreat

The Faculty Senate met Friday to discuss the role of research and teaching and their effects on students and faculty at the University. The retreat was a springing point for this year's Senate agenda, which will look into the role of research and teaching at the University.


News

Honor keeps grievance panel in 7-7-1 vote

Honor Committee Chairman Hunter Ferguson broke a tie vote and decided to retain pre-trial grievance panels after the Committee voted 7-7-1 on the issue in its meeting last night. Students are able to appeal cases to a grievance panel after being accused of an honor offense but before going to trial. Ferguson decided against eliminating the panel because the Committee has not fully discussed its merits, he said. Several Committee members expressed concern about the panel because the current bylaws concerning the panel allow the Executive Committee to appoint itself as a grievance panel and dismiss a case.


News

Proposed Board plan raises racial concerns

In response to growing criticism over the legality of using race as a factor in admissions, the Office of Admissions and the Provost's Office have drawn up a proposal for a summer program to help recruit students from diverse backgrounds. The program, which will target underprivileged and minority middle and high school students, will be a two-week session at the University where students are exposed to various academic and social aspects of the University, Dean of Admissions John A.


News

Rue encourages involvement in Hereford residential life

Situated on the University's outer fringes, Hereford College has established a reputation as a community unto itself, which was affirmed at last night's convocation for Hereford College students at Runk dining hall. The eight-year old residential college provides programming for residents to give the college a sense of community. "The horizons of Hereford are only beginning to be articulated," Hereford College Principal Daniel Bluestone said. The convocation ceremony included the induction of Hereford fellows, who are deans and professors responsible for "organizing programs that resonate with the people who are living here," Bluestone said. Among the inductees was Dean of Students Penny Rue, who was hired in the spring to replace former Dean of Students Robert T.


News

Group plans to finalize cultural board structure

A group of students and administrators are finalizing their plans to implement a cultural programming board, which has been allocated more than $30,000 to bring diverse programs to the University. The board will be composed of students and administrators, and will report to William W.


News

Faculty disagree with web notes

Several Web sites now are offering University students money for posting their course notes on the Internet, a practice University and Honor Committee officials say may challenge the University's ideals of intellectual integrity. Two such sites, www.studentu.com and www.allstudents.com, offer students up to $300 and $400 per semester, respectively.