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Students battle language lab lines

The University's newly renovated digital foreign language lab faced growing pains this week as students flooded the center with their first week's assignments. Students were forced to sign up on waitlists and wait up to 20 minutes for a vacant lab computer. The lab was crowded because hours were cut back to accommodate student and faculty training. "Instructors were scheduled to bring in classes as a whole for training," said David T.


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Bloomfield energizes physics

Are you interested in why balls bounce and planes fly? Many students graduate from the University knowing the answers to these and other questions, all about "How Things Work." Physics Prof.


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Couric criticizes Gilmore policies

State Sen. Emily Couric, D-Charlottesville, Del. Mitch Van Yahres, D-Charlottesville, and House of Delegates candidate Ed Wayland (D) held a press conference on the steps of the Rotunda yesterday, lambasting Virginia Gov.


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University follows stadium plan

Despite recent complaints by Jefferson Park neighborhood residents over the appearance of elements of the Scott Stadium expansion, Board of Visitors members and University administrators said it is unlikely that the Board will initiate any major project facelift. "I don't foresee any action on this item" at the Board's October meeting, University Rector John P.


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Honor questions pre-trial procedures

Continuing review of the Honor Committee's bylaws has prompted Committee members to question how an honor case should be handled in between the Investigative Panel and the trial stages. Recent discussion has centered on the possibility that a biased Executive Committee could abuse their power by unjustly dismissing a case. "Some cases may be fundamentally unfair to the accused student, and there is the need for a mechanism to dismiss them," Graduate Arts and Sciences Rep.


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Administrators call for more diverse faculty

(This is the first in a two-part weekly series on faculty diversity) Although a recent study shows that universities and colleges have hired more women and minority faculty members in the last seven years than ever before, University officials say all its departments will have to step up efforts in recruiting or the door of equal opportunity may slide shut. According to an American Association of State Colleges and Universities newsletter, the report, published by the National Center for Education Statistics, shows that faculty who have seven years or less experience tend to be more diverse than faculty with more experience and tenure.


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Sigourney Weaver to attend film fest

Entitled "TechnoVisions," this year's Virginia Film Festival hopes to draw a large audience by featuring big-name actress Sigourney Weaver and Stan Winston, a University alumnus and special effects guru. In contrast to last year's "Cool" theme, the technological aspects of this year's Festival will be "more of a visceral experience" for filmgoers, said Richard Herskowitz, festival director and drama professor. "We're having many more rides and virtual reality experiences ... We're emphasizing movies as thrill rides.


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Sept. 9, 1999 represents first in Y2K problems

If the world hasn't ended when you read this article, then the first hurdle of Y2K has been passed and the lesser-known cousin of Y2K, the September 9, 1999 Problem, has been bypassed. The Y2K problem stems from the fact that in a memory-precious era of computing, only the last two digits of a year are encoded.


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Candidates discuss political platforms

The election season is coming on full force at the University, where last night students had an opportunity to hear both Democratic and Republican candidates for state and local offices pitch their platforms. The candidates, who, coincidentally, were invited by the University Democrats and College Republicans on the same night in Cabell Hall, went on to discuss the issues that most concerned them, including education and health care. Ed Wayland, a Democratic candidate for the state House of Delegates, spoke first at a meeting of University Democrats, where he stressed that this election cycle is crucial, since the majority in the Virginia General Assembly is up for grabs.


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Professors investigate natural heart disease defense molecule

University researchers may shed light onto the body's natural defenses against inflammation of arteries, which ultimately can lead to heart attacks and strokes, in a study published last month in Science. University Biomedical Engineering, Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics professor Dr. Klaus Ley and Dr. Yuqing Huo, began investigating epoxyeicosatrienoic acid -- or EET -- during the summer of 1996. They collaborated with colleagues at Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. EET is a short-lived product of metabolism that can prevent inflammation in heart arteries.


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City residents debate land-swap proposal

Charlottesville residents packed City Council chambers late Tuesday evening, debating for over two hours about a proposed land-swap that would make three acres of park land available for residential development. Local developer Stan Tatem has offered to trade the city nearly 16 acres adjoining Riverview Park for three acres of park land near Pen Park and the Locust Grove neighborhood. Following Tuesday's hearing, which was the first public discussion of the proposal, City Council moved to vote on the issue at their Sept.


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Students, faculty irked by overcrowded classes

As University students and faculty settle into their second week of classes, many again are faced with overcrowded rooms and long waiting lists -- problems that some faculty members trace to a lack of resources. The College appears to be the hardest hit when it comes to overcrowded classes and the problem especially is prevalent in the government, English and foreign language departments, faculty members said. Robert Fatton, professor and chair of the government and foreign affairs department, recognized the problem, but said his department cannot add enough new courses because it has "exhausted it's money for new sections and" teaching assistants.


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New study shows college women risk depression

Depression is common in about half of all female students as they try to adjust to college life, according to a recent study conducted at UCLA. The study found depression is now more prevalent among first-year females than in any other college population.


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Medical Center reports increased revenue

Regardless of a nation-wide trend of drastic medical school financial losses, the University Medical Center reported yesterday that while it had a strong fiscal year, the Center still is struggling to harness ever-growing expenses.


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City officials debate plans for parkway

Route 29 has major traffic problems, and several local leaders are hoping the controversial Meadowcreek Parkway will be part of the solution. With the support of both Charlottesville and Albemarle County, the matter of approving the parkway now rests solely with the Commonwealth Transportation Board, a governor-appointed board that oversees all state transportation issues. The Meadowcreek Parkway would be a two-mile road between Rio Road in Albemarle and Charlottesville's Route 250 bypass.


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Students, Charlottesville officials continue to conflict over University parking issues

Despite University and city officials' continued efforts to ease the trauma of Charlottesville's notoriously limited parking, students and residents are still complaining of a lose-lose situation. Charlottesville's creation of a 24-hour parking permit zone last year at University Circle, a street where many University students and faculty live, sparked controversy when residents thought it unfairly restricted parking privileges to those who held the $10 permits.