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Garden Room combats apathy

The Faculty Senate is seeking ways to revitalize the struggling Garden Room, a dining facility that opened last fall as part of an effort to cultivate the University's intellectual community. The facility, located on the West Range, is supposed to foster student, staff and faculty interaction, but has not been attracting enough patrons, Director of Dining Services Edward Gutauskas said. The Garden Room needs to become more profitable, Gutaukas said. "It's a popular place but it doesn't cover its own cost," he said. About 75 faculty, staff, graduate students and invited undergraduates now eat lunch each weekday at the Garden Room, he added. "If we can increase the usage 15 or 20 people a day" the facility will cover its own cost, Faculty Senate Chairman David T.


News

Madison House may face 5 percent yearly cut in funds

As the battle over how much Student Activity Fee funding Madison House should receive enters its third year, a proposal has been put on the table which would restructure the way Madison House receives SAF money by decreasing funding by 5 percent each year. The new plan, proposed by Student Council members and William W.


News

Committee works for ID-free AFC entrance

The Honor Committee is undertaking a semester-long drive to allow students without their ID cards to use the Aquatic and Fitness Center by citing the honor code. Students now are required to show their IDs before using the gym's facilities, but the Committee is preparing to take action and eliminate this requirement at the gym and other places on Grounds. "Students can go to stores at the Corner or in downtown, write checks without identification and be trusted.


News

Kick carries Cavs to 20-17 victory

Last year, kicker Todd Braverman was known more for the kicks he missed than the ones he made. If Saturday's opener against North Carolina was any indication, things might be different for Braverman in 1999. After failing to convert on pivotal field goals against both Georgia and Georgia Tech last season, Braverman nailed a 50-yard, game-winning field goal to lift Virginia to a 20-17 defeat of North Carolina. "Everybody was questioning me" after last year, Braverman said.


News

Orientation meets mixed reaction

The revamped orientation program has drawn mixed reactions from first-year students -- although many reported the new summer session was useful, many also complained that fall orientation was repetitious and dull. Fall orientation "was okay -- some of it was helpful and other stuff was boring," first-year College student Sarah Marchetti said. First-year students went through a four-day fall orientation program, from Saturday Aug.


News

Part-time students to serve on Honor

The Honor Committee changed its bylaws yesterday to allow part-time students to be elected to the Honor Committee.** The move was made so two new Committee members could be elected to represent the School of Continuing Education. The Committee appointed an ad hoc committee in order to fill the two Continuing Education School positions -- by either election or appointment -- as early as this fall. Last spring, the Board of Visitors stipulated that part-time students in the School of Continuing Education are eligible to receive degrees and will be represented on the Honor Committee. Although originally intended to apply only to continuing education students, the proposal was amended to allow part-time graduate students to serve on the Committee as well. Vice Chairman for Services Cordell Faulk supported the addition of Continuing Education and other part time student representatives to the Committee. "Why should we deny students who live under the system the right to represent themselves?" Faulk said.


News

First years continue trek to Rugby

Despite the recent crackdown on underage drinking by the University administration, some first-year students still participated in the annual pilgrimage to Rugby Road during their first full weekend at the University. While accounts of the frequency of underage drinking differed, many first years claimed that it was relatively easy for underage students to obtain alcohol at fraternity-hosted parties.


News

Stadium expansion frustrates residents

The Scott Stadium expansion has sparked concerns from Charlottesville residents over a 23-foot concrete wall that stands facing their homes. Near the new Bryant Hall on Stadium Road stands a large concrete retaining wall facing Shamrock Road, which has a concrete fa


News

Assailants attack, rob drunk student

A University student reported being robbed by four unknown black males early yesterday morning while walking home from the Corner along Hospital Drive with some of his friends. According to police, the student had been drinking, was unable to walk and was being accompanied home by two of his friends. According to police, at around 2:20 a.m., the suspects approached the three students and pretended to lend them assistance. "They were leaving the Corner and just passing through Grounds when these guys just came up to them," University Police Capt.


News

SAT soon could record social factors

To help colleges and universities with the sticky admissions process, the Educational Testing Service, the company behind the SAT, may soon label high-scoring students who have overcome adverse social backgrounds as "strivers." The system still is in the research stages, but anti-affirmative action activists fear the acceptance of a model which takes into account a student's race. Using survey questions at the beginning of the test, the system would consider 14 factors in determining a student's environment.


News

Web applications near completion

Electronic applications for prospective first-year and transfer students will become available online by the second week of September. "The actual form will be electronically transmitted to the University electronic database," making it easier for students to apply and for the Office of Admissions to process applications, Assoc.


News

Break-ins threaten computer security

What if someone stole your computing password? They could log in as you, send e-mail as you - and assume your electronic identity. Stolen passwords are one of the security threats posed by hackers that attempt to gain unauthorized access to computer systems. This summer, several computer break-ins occurred at the University. In Clark Hall, there were three related break-ins to the building's Sun workstations - the first in late June, the second in mid-July and the third in late July/early August, said William Shane Brandon, Computer Systems Engineer for the Environmental Sciences department. Brandon discovered that the hacker had broken in to one of the computers running an old version of the Sun operating system and was using that to break in to other computers. "They used this machine to attack other machines," Brandon said. The old operating system on the home base computer made it easier to gain unauthorized access. "It had a very old operating system," said Computer Center Lead Engineer Hamp Carruth, "Security holes had never been closed." After discovering the break-in on the computers in Clark Hall, logs were analyzed to identify the people whose passwords had been detected by the hacker, Carruth said.


News

ISIS telephone service faces new online competition

Good-bye ISIS man, hello mouse. University students now can click their way into classes from their personal computers, thanks to a new online program that already has begun to compete with the telephone as the preferred method of registration. "I think probably by spring registration, we'll see the Web overtake the phone.


News

Professors strive to curb grade inflation

University students may feel the pinch as faculty members face additional pressure this year to bring the problem of grade inflation under control. Over the past several years, the University and other schools nationwide have come under intense scrutiny as students' average grade point averages crept upwards. Faculty Senate Chairman David T.