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The Cavalier Daily
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News

Darden receives $1 million donation

James W. Todd, an alumnus of the Darden School, pledged $1 million to his alma mater during his 35th class reunion. Todd directed his pledge to support case-method research and the Batten Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership. Elaine Ruggieri, Darden School Public Relations Director, explained that case studies are the main learning tool of the Darden curriculum. Ruggieri said that one of the up-and-coming components of case research included multimedia cases.


News

Kennedy tragedy evokes sorrow

The recovery of the remains of John F. Kennedy Jr., Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy, and Lauren Bessette yesterday confirmed that America's most high-profile family had endured yet another tragedy.


News

Faculty Senate sets goals for fall semester

The Faculty Senate plans to expand upon the idea of "intellectual community" that began under past Faculty Senate Chairman Jahan Ramazani, and will also focus on the unexplored theme of research and scholarship next year.


News

Student groups, administrators receive letters from 21 Society

Little is still known about the new 21 Society that formed last month. The 21 Society, created with the goal of instilling a greater sense of student self-governance at the University, sent out 21 letters two weeks ago announcing their formation on June 21. According to a letter dated that same day, and left at The Cavalier Daily office July 6, The 21 Society was founded in order "to unify the politically active students of the University." Each recipient received a different number on his or her letter.


News

Quarterly publishes new Faulkner short story

A previously unpublished short story by William Faulkner was published in the July 2 issue of The Virginia Quarterly Review. "I didn't realize that there was anything left [of Faulkner's] to publish," said Staige Blackford, editor of the literary journal.


News

Gies sets new Senate year agenda

The Faculty Senate plans to expand upon the idea of "intellectual community" that began under past Faculty Senate Chairman Jahan Ramazani, and will also focus on the unexplored theme of research and scholarship. Senate Chairman David T.


News

JRB denies assault appeals

The Judicial Review Board ended the University disciplinary saga involving rising fourth-year College students Richard Smith and Harrison Kerr Tigrett last month by denying their appeals, sources close to the case said.


News

Student groups return over $130,000 in SAF funding

Cavalier Daily Staff Writers Contracted Independent Organizations did not use about $130,000 in Student Activity Fee allocations this year and the money will now be recycled to the next appropriations process. The $130,000 is "about 20 percent of the total amount of allocations-up considerably from past years," Student Activities Business Manager William Hancher said.


News

School courts note increasing role of professional attorneys

The University's honor and judiciary systems have experienced a very heavy presence of lawyers and lawsuits in recent months compared to peer schools. The University's honor system has been subject to more recent lawsuits than other colleges and universities, said Rutgers University Prof.


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Kory offered to settle case for $500,000

Alexander "Sandy" Kory offered to drop all University Judiciary Committee charges and to release all civil claims against Richard Smith, Harrison Kerr Tigrett and Bradley Kintz in exchange for $500,000, according to a May 5 letter from Kory's attorney, Lloyd Snook.


News

Corner Meal Plan readies for national expansion

Soon the Corner Meal Plan may be reaching far beyond the confines of University Avenue and West Main Street. The Corner's alternative to University meal plans, which has been catering to students for seven years, is putting the gears in motion to turn into a nationwide corporation. "The Corner Meal Plan is in the process of franchising nationally through a parent company called Meal Ticket," Corner Meal Plan President Kent Schwager said. In its efforts to establish itself as a national company, the Corner Meal Plan has hired Charles Carroll as their Director of Franchise Development.


News

Orientation welcomes first years

With three sessions already completed, the University's new summer orientation program appears to be a success, student orientation leaders said. A total of 794 students have attended the two sessions so far, with 910 guests accompanying them. "For a program running for its first time, everything is fitting together rather smoothly," Student Orientation Leader Beth Van Doren said. The orientation program is being held over the summer for the first time.


News

U.S. News gives University hospital high rankings

The 10th annual guide to "America's Best Hospitals" in U.S. News and World Report has listed 10 medical specialties of the University's Health System as each being one of the top 50 departments in the nation. The issue, which came out on newsstands Monday, included two newcomers to the list-cardiology and heart surgery and geriatrics. "I think this reflects our commitment to patients and the quality of care we deliver," said Dr. Jonathon Truwit, Associate Director of Internal Medicine.


News

UJC, Honor combat legal difficulties

A series of recent lawsuits and increasing amounts of administrative guidance have generated mixed opinions about the status of self-governance at two of the University's most symbolic institutions--the Honor and Judiciary committees. Public and media scrutiny, legal pressure and outside investigation have characterized the student-run organizations in the past year. Such legal intervention in the Honor and Judiciary Committees' workings, when coupled with other changes at the University, has threatened student self-governance, said Brock Jolly, Student Council vice president for administration. "Over the past few years, student self-governance has definitely been challenged, if not compromised," Jolly said.


News

With Hutchinson's ERICA, the eyes have it

Thomas Hutchinson is not the stereotypical scientific genius his work may suggest. A University professor of systems engineering, Hutchinson clearly disproves the myth of the pocket protector nerd as he sits comfortably in his office.


News

Student groups to move to Newcomb

With only six weeks left until the start of the fall semester, several University organizations finally will find a place to call home. In April, top University administrators decided that all student organizations with office space on the first floor and in the basement of Peabody Hall would have to vacate the building to make room for the Office of Admissions. A new special collections library will eventually replace Miller Hall, which now houses the Office of Admissions. H.