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Dorantes describes Guatemala's strict military regulation

Government oppression and politically inspired crimes continue to plague Guatemala, Guatemalan citizen Irma Graciela Azmitia Dorantes said at last night's La Sociedad Latina meeting in New Cabell Hall. Dorantes fled Guatemala in 1982 after three members of her family were killed by whom she thought may be the Guatemalan military.


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Illegal drug trends vary across city, county lines

Charlottesville boasts a rich history, beautiful scenery and even celebrity residents -- all of which can make the city of just over 40,000 seem immune to the drug problems which plague large urban areas. Yet some areas of Charlottesville are experiencing problems with marijuana, powder cocaine, crack cocaine and drug-related crime. While there are not many stable, organized groups of drug dealers in Charlottesville, the city is sometimes beset by transient dealers who peddle their wares for a short time before moving on, said Lt.


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IFCJC investigates

Online Only: IFC Press Release The Inter-Fraternity Council announced yesterday that it has launched a formal investigation into hazing allegations made against the Phi Delta Theta fraternity.


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University grants FOA for new Asian sorority

The University approved the Fraternal Organization Agreement yesterday for the Fraternity-Sorority Council's second sorority, alpha Kappa Delta Phi. All fraternal organizations must sign an FOA to be officially affiliated with the University.


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Honor to review policy on psychological evaluations

The Honor Committee is revising their psychological evaluation process because of concerns about delays and inefficiency. At the start of an honor case investigation, honor investigators ask the student suspected of the violation if "any mental or medical conditions affected the situation in question." If the student answers yes, the investigator provides them with the procedure for psychological hearings on honor offenses. Students who feel they may have had a contributory mental disorder when they committed the honor offense or now lack the mental capacity to stand trial can ask for an evaluation. Students must obtain a letter from a psychiatrist describing the nature of their illness and make a written request to the Committee's vice chair for trials. When these criteria are met, the vice chair for trials forwards the request to the Office of the Dean of Students.


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NCAA sanctions basketball for violations

In an official statement released yesterday, the NCAA's Committee of Infractions concluded that the Virginia men's basketball program committed secondary violations of the organization's bylaws and recommended a punishment that reduces the University's number of grant-in-aids and official recruiting visits. The violations center primarily around improper payments made to a recruit early in 1996 by the basketball program, including a $50 deposit and rent payments of $200 per month for an apartment.


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City construction may ease drug problem

The part of Charlottesville on "the other side of the tracks," of the Amtrak train station, known as Fifeville, may not look like the stereotypical run-down inner-city neighborhood, but over the years it has had a disproportionately high number of drug arrests, including a drug bust last spring. But now, the neighborhood of Fifeville will be safe enough for a University daycare center - one step in a series of many to improve the Fifeville economy and clean up remnants of a once-vibrant drug scene.


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Campaign edges past $950 million

The University's Capital Campaign has raised $957 million as of Aug. 31, President John T. Casteen III told the Faculty Senate yesterday. The $957 million total includes $840 million in cash gifts and pledges and $117 in future support, Casteen said. Director of Development Communications William Sublette said the last few months have been particularly successful in bringing the University closer to its goal of $1 billion by Dec.


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Rain postpones diversity rally on Lawn

Rain put a damper on students' plans for an "October Camp" demonstration yesterday on the Lawn as organizers had to delay the two-day long "celebration of diversity" due to bad weather. The event is designed to educate the University community about using race as a factor in the University's admissions process and was rescheduled for tomorrow and Thursday, organizer and third-year Education student Jenny Johnson said. "We were setting up camp at 7 a.m., but the rain just kept coming down," Johnson said. She said organizers made the decision to change the date of the "October Camp" at about 9:30 a.m.


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Author tells of problems black rape victims face

The silence of black female rape victims is slowly being broken, author and rape survivor Charlotte Pierce-Baker told a solemn crowd in Minor Hall Auditorium last night. Pierce-Baker, who wrote "Surviving the Silence: Black Women's Stories of Rape," said she continues to grow and learn from her book, which was named one of the Best Books of 1998 by both the Los Angeles Times and The Philadelphia Enquirer.


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Honor tackles BOV concerns, bias in appeals

In response to the Board of Visitors' concerns about the fairness of the Honor Committee's appeal process, the Committee has taken steps to ensure that its members will not be reviewing cases on which they have previously worked. Last winter, the Board suggested the Committee consider allowing an outside body to hear appeals of Honor cases to avoid possible bias during the appeals process, which allows the vice chair for trials to screen the appeal, even if he or she was involved in the case at an earlier stage. But Sunday night the Committee changed its bylaws in an attempt to address the Board's concerns without allowing an outside body to review their decisions. Previously, the vice chair for trials had the power to screen appeals before either dismissing them or sending them on to a pre-appeal panel. Under the new bylaw, the move will take this discretionary power away from the vice chair for trials and distribute it among Committee members. The change will free the vice chair for trials to sit on Investigative Panels and to chair trials.


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ADE organizes Lawn rally to back diversity

The Advocates for Diversity in Education will celebrate diversity and show their support for the use of race in the admissions process with a rally and encampment on the lower Lawn today. ADE named the event October Camp and will present speakers and performances advocating the importance of affirmative action.


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Capital One president discusses practices

Adding to the recent influx of on-Grounds recruiters, Nigel Morris, president and chief operating officer for Capital One Financial Corporation, came to Alumni Hall last Tuesday to discuss why his company has a successful working environment. The company's casual and unique management style and image found are the result of the path that Morris followed before founding the company with CEO Richard Fairbank.


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Faculty display project plans at Teaching Initiative Forum

A virtual collection of plants for Architecture students, graphics teaching videos for computer science students, a new cutting table to create intricate clothing for costume design students and a comprehensive Web site for women's studies students were among the projects that the Teaching Resource Center and Faculty Senate displayed Friday. This is the third year that the Teaching Resource Center has allocated $100,000 from a $300,000 grant from the Office of the Vice President and Provost to fund the University Teaching Initiative Forum - projects that were created by various faculty, Faculty Senate Chairwoman-elect Patricia H.


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Council members gear up for next city mayor election

Following Charlottesville Mayor Virginia Daugherty's announcement that she will not seek re-election to City Council next fall, an additional Council seat has opened up for the May elections. After serving on Council for eight years, Daugherty announced last Thursday that she will not be running in May.


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Academics condemn Web sites selling classroom notes

Following the recent posting of college class notes on commercial Web sites, some faculty members throughout the country are expressing concerns about the practice. Mathieu Deflem, assistant professor of sociology at Purdue University, has launched a Website of his own in order to discourage online notes.