The Cavalier Daily
Serving the University Community Since 1890

News


News

X-ray-ted view

As chairman of the Chandra Science Users Committee -- responsible for decisions on how to use one of the most powerful and expensive instruments ever propelled into space -- University Astronomy Prof.


News

Student health offers new morning-after pill

Emergency Contraception 10 million women of childbearing age are having sex on the average night in the United States Over 70% of women 18 to 24 years old have already had their first sexual experience without the benefit of contraception. 2.7 million unintended pregnancies occurred in 1995 (the last year for which data was available). 27,000 condoms slip or break on the average night in the U.S. Of the 60 million women in the United States age 15 to 44, 28.8 million have had at least one unintended pregnancy. 28 percent of these women reported having an abortion. Experts at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists estimate that EC pills could prevent 1.7 million unintended pregnancies and 800,000 abortions in the U.S.


News

Madison House plan sets rate of defunding

After almost three years of negotiations, hassles and headaches, Student Council and Madison House have hammered out an agreement stipulating how much Student Activity Fee funding the community service organization will receive over the next nine years. The agreement is "the best deal Student Council can work out with Madison House," said Council Chief Financial Officer John Finley, who presented the proposal to Council Tuesday night.


News

Phi Kap allegedly violates FOA

An underage Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity brother allegedly attempted to purchase alcohol with a house check, which violates the fraternity's Fraternal Organization Agreement, according to sources and a police summons.


News

University students wear out plastic, face costs

As credit card companies entice students with everything from free t-shirts to college-themed shot glasses, some state officials say students are sometimes signing up for a cycle of debt when they sign up for new credit cards. Credit cards can be useful financial tools because they offer the convenience of knowing an item can be purchased now and paid for later.


News

College development office tracks wealthy applicants

A student whose parents may be inclined to donate money to the University may receive a small advantage when being considered in the admissions process, University officials say. According to documents obtained by The Cavalier Daily , the College's development office tracks applicants based on how much money their families and friends can contribute to the University. One document, which was sent to the Office of the President, has a list of "priority" and "regular" admissions prospects.


News

Alleged sorority intruder breaks parole guidelines

Orange County resident Garnett Lloyd, 29, who was arrested last spring for two counts of allegedly breaking and entering Delta Zeta sorority house, is in jail again today after a Charlottesville judge revoked his bail for a parole violation. This violation was the result of Lloyd's arrest and charge for allegedly making a threatening phone call to a 17-year-old Orange County girl Friday Oct.


News

Students cast votes

Students from 17 schools around the state discovered a new use for the Internet yesterday. In the largest Internet election ever held, 11,000 students cast their votes for mock Virginia elections. The event, sponsored by the University's Center for Governmental Studies as part of its Youth Leadership Initiative, included schools from Charlottesville, Albemarle County and several other areas around the state. Larry J.


News

Legislators tackle student debt

Legislation? Education? A ban on solicitation? A small group of state legislators is debating such options in trying to combat the scourge of student credit card debt at Virginia colleges and universities. "There is an issue of irresponsibility among financial institutions in offering credit to people who are not credit worthy," said Del.


News

Peer schools deny using admissions tracking lists

Officials from several peer institutions of higher education said they do not use any tracking mechanism for prospective students on the basis of possible financial contributions. "We certainly do not do that, we have no plans to, and we have no reason to do so," said Marlyn McGrath-Lewis, director of admissions at Harvard University. But University of Virginia spokeswoman Louise Dudley said a centralized system designed to handle external recommendations is not unusual at certain institutions. "This is a common kind of practice at a selective college or university," Dudley said. Many selective institutions of higher education, however, denied the use of this practice. Development officials at Harvard only solicit donations from students or students' parents after the students have graduated, McGrath-Lewis said. The College of William & Mary does not make lists of prospective students either, but does consider whether the student can bring financial contributions to the College, said David Trott, William & Mary associate dean of admission. "We are looking obviously for what a student can bring to campus," Trott said.


News

Panelists discuss future of world affairs

About 100 students listened as representatives from seven student organizations debated whether the United States has political, social, moral and economic obligations to developing nations last night in Wilson Hall. Robert Fatton, government and foreign affairs department chair, moderated the panel, which was sponsored by the International Relations Organization.


News

Deans renew FOA contract with Phi Psi

Phi Kappa Psi fraternity re-joined the Inter-Fraternity Council and re-established a formal relationship with the University yesterday after the Office of the Dean of Students officially reinstated the fraternity's Fraternal Organization Agreement. Phi Psi lost IFC recognition April 10 after five pledges were arrested Feb.


News

OAAA faculty mentorship faces dearth of minority participation

Minority University students have an opportunity available for interaction with faculty members -- but few have taken advantage of it. The Faculty-Student Mentoring Program, run by the Office of African-American Affairs, offers black, Latino, Asian and Native American students the chance to have a personal relationship with faculty members and administrators. Peter Yu, assistant dean in the Office of African-American Affairs, said while the program has been in existence for five years, it is being underutilized. Fifty students now are involved in the program, Yu said, and nearly 100 faculty and administrators want to participate as mentors. He said the OAAA now is working to try to attract more minority students to the program. "We're trying to get more students involved," he said, adding that the office has stepped up its publicity efforts for the program this semester. Dean of Students Penny Rue said that, although she has not been assigned a student to mentor, she has had "good conversations" with students who are part of the program. Part of the reason students are not fully utilizing the program is that they are "hesitant to put themselves forward" and join it, Rue said. Students need to "get the chutzpah to do it," she said. Faculty Senate Chairman David T.


News

Alumni Association reports more student members

Students are joining the Alumni Association before they graduate at higher rates than in past years thanks to an ongoing effort by the organization to increase its membership by offering more tangible benefits to members. Current students can join the Association as a Student Life Member while still enrolled at the University if they commit to paying a membership fee either before or after graduation.