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Early decision sees decline in applications

As the Office of Undergraduate Admissions begins to review early decision applications for the 2000-2001 academic year, it is dealing with a smaller number of prospective students than last year - a phenomenon that can be attributed to a combination of factors, officials said. The applications, which were due Nov.


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Federal law grants D.C. students in-state tuition

Some out-of-state students finally will get their wish of paying in-state tuition rates at the University. A new federal law will give some Washington, D.C., residents up to $10,000 per year to attend Maryland or Virginia public institutions of higher education. The bill, which was signed into law Friday by President Clinton, has drawn mixed reactions. Although Julius F.


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Honor subcommittee to oversee transitions

The Honor Committee voted 17-3 last night to form a subcommittee that will orient next year's incoming Committee to its complex system of rules and bylaws. Several of the lawsuits filed against the University in relation to the honor system have criticized the transition process between Committees. For example, a lawsuit filed Nov.


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Students take shots at 'fifth' tradition

"I wish I had done it. It's my biggest regret," fourth-year College student Dan Wilson said. He was not talking about taking his University coursework more seriously over the years, or selecting a different major.


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Panel discusses Academical Village, Web

Fortune magazine's April report that many University graduates are heading leading technology companies was the inspiration for the third and final session of the e-summit, "The Academical Village in the Internet Age," Saturday in Old Cabell Hall.


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Cuomo announces computer program to aid homeowners

During a speech in the Rotunda Dome Room Friday, Andrew Cuomo, U.S. secretary of Housing and Urban Development, announced plans to implement a computer program designed to make it easier to buy a home. Cuomo said the new system will help make the process of procuring a mortgage less mysterious and more accessible to all Americans -- not just those who are already financially knowledgeable -- by using an electronic scorecard to evaluate what qualifications a borrower has for obtaining a mortgage. He said the initiative will "protect the integrity of the home-buying process." He added that he hopes the new initiative will not serve as an end to HUD's partnership with the private sector, but instead will be a "foundation for further dialogue." HUD should continue to play an important role in national politics, Cuomo said. He said sometimes HUD is neglected when the government is developing the budget, and serves as a "piggy bank" for other areas of the government. HUD has an obligation to find the "best ways to improve housing opportunities for all Americans," he added. The speech was co-sponsored by Mortgage Bankers Association of America and the University's Center for Governmental Studies. Larry J.


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University alumni start online company

When planning a party, the list of things to do is always overwhelming. Sharad Daswani, a 1995 Commerce School graduate, said he knows how difficult it can be to mail out invitations and keep track of who has returned an RSVP.


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Parents work to fix off-Grounds safety

The University Parents Program may collaborate with University police and the Office of the Dean of Students in jump starting an off-Grounds housing safety evaluation program. Parents Program Director Molly Bass said planning still is in preliminary stages, but that the three parties probably will meet before the end of the semester. One potential approach to the project would involve compiling a comprehensive list of off-Grounds housing options and their safety features, Bass said. The listing would not label housing "good vs.


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Spring rush effects vary by fraternity

Although Dean of Students Penny Rue's unwillingness to negotiate rush dates still is upsetting, not all fraternity houses are suffering financial losses from the move of Inter-Fraternity Council rush from the fall to the spring, several house presidents said yesterday. Rue gave a letter to IFC President Wes Kaupinen Tuesday stating that formal rush dates will remain in the spring semester, after Kaupinen sent Rue a written request to open rush date negotiations for the 2000-2001 academic year. Many fraternity presidents and IFC executives have said houses incur significant financial losses because of deferred rush, as each brother pays a semester less in dues. But Pi Lambda Phi President Jack Warburton said the financial effects of deferred rush on his house have been negligent. "Our house doesn't have a financial problem," Warburton said. Delta Sigma Phi President Derek Burgess said the financial hit has not been hard on his house either. Delta Sig has had "no major problems, but [every house] is being hurt somewhat financially because of the semester loss," Burgess said. But for other houses, the financial blow may be devastating, so the IFC should continue its efforts to return rush to the fall, Delta Tau Delta President Brian Bernier said. "We're definitely not just going to leave the issue alone," Bernier said.


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Seven students nominated for Rhodes program

"Truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship." This year, the University's selection committee decided that seven former and current University students possess these traits - traits that Cecil Rhodes chose as requirements in 1902 for all Rhodes Scholarship students. The seven University students were nominated to send in their applications to their state's Rhodes Scholarship selection committee.


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Officials debate uses for tobacco money

Following a $206 billion settlement with the tobacco industry, officials in Virginia are figuring out how much of the Commonwealth's four billion dollar share to spend on cancer research, youth prevention programs and economic aid. Virginia's share of the settlement will be distributed over the next 25 years.


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Full FAFSA becomes available on Internet

A Department of Education plan is encouraging more college students to apply for financial aid online by enabling students to send in their entire Free Application for Federal Student Aid form electronically. Tony Starks, Federal Student Aid representative from the Department of Education, said that although the online FAFSA form has been available for four years, this is the first year electronic signatures could be used to fill out the application completely online. The new Electronic Access Code can be used by applicants as a personal identification number and will work as "a signature, an authorization," Starks said. University Financial Aid Director Yvonne Hubbard said that previously even online applicants "still had to print out a signature page, sign it and send it out." Hubbard said the University's Office of Financial Aid advocates online financial applications for a variety of reasons. "The key here is that [the online financial aid applications] make it very fast," she said.


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Council denies runoff request

The Student Council Elections Committee voted last night 8-1 with one abstention not to hold runoff elections after a "discrepancy" was filed by candidate Prince Agarwal, who finished seventh in last week's College Representative election. The runoff election would have been held between sixth place finisher Kelly Harris and Agarwal, said Brock Jolly, vice president for administration and head of College elections.


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CardioVillage offers new medical resources

The University Health System launched a new educational Web site designed to provide up-to-date information about all aspects of cardiovascular medicine to physicians, medical students and the general public last Saturday. The project, called www.


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Music festival showcases technology

Hoping to bridge the divide between technology and the arts, the University is hosting Technosonics, a computer music festival featuring many leading performers and composers of digital music. Technosonics is a three-part series featuring concerts tonight and Saturday night, both in the Old Cabell Hall Auditorium.