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News

Break-ins threaten computer security

What if someone stole your computing password? They could log in as you, send e-mail as you - and assume your electronic identity. Stolen passwords are one of the security threats posed by hackers that attempt to gain unauthorized access to computer systems. This summer, several computer break-ins occurred at the University. In Clark Hall, there were three related break-ins to the building's Sun workstations - the first in late June, the second in mid-July and the third in late July/early August, said William Shane Brandon, Computer Systems Engineer for the Environmental Sciences department. Brandon discovered that the hacker had broken in to one of the computers running an old version of the Sun operating system and was using that to break in to other computers. "They used this machine to attack other machines," Brandon said. The old operating system on the home base computer made it easier to gain unauthorized access. "It had a very old operating system," said Computer Center Lead Engineer Hamp Carruth, "Security holes had never been closed." After discovering the break-in on the computers in Clark Hall, logs were analyzed to identify the people whose passwords had been detected by the hacker, Carruth said.


News

ISIS telephone service faces new online competition

Good-bye ISIS man, hello mouse. University students now can click their way into classes from their personal computers, thanks to a new online program that already has begun to compete with the telephone as the preferred method of registration. "I think probably by spring registration, we'll see the Web overtake the phone.


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Professors strive to curb grade inflation

University students may feel the pinch as faculty members face additional pressure this year to bring the problem of grade inflation under control. Over the past several years, the University and other schools nationwide have come under intense scrutiny as students' average grade point averages crept upwards. Faculty Senate Chairman David T.


News

Violent crime shocks community, prompts calls

Days after the University and a group of parents put up a $10,000 reward to help catch the man who raped a University student in her home last Thursday, police are answering calls from people responding with information about the case. However, only about 10 to 15 percent of the people calling police with tips are interested in the reward money, said Richard Hudson, a Charlottesville Police detective who answers phones at the Crimestoppers hotline. The shocking nature of such a crime naturally generates a lot of interest - and a lot of calls, Hudson said. "I've been doing this for 17 years and I've seen a lot of sexual assaults," he said.


News

Language lab renovation enhances learning process

At a time when digital video disc technology is beginning to outdate compact discs, the language lab has taken a big step towards modernization by digitizing 80 percent of its audiocassettes. In their first day of language classes yesterday, many students were introduced to the University's $1.1 million renovation of the Multimedia Language Learning Laboratory in Cabell Hall. The Arts & Sciences Center for Instructional Technologies has added 58 state-of-the art computers and an interactive teacher-student console to the language laboratory. Phase I of the project included technology and hardware upgrades and furniture purchases.


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Patrolling increases in Venable school vicinity

The Charlottesville and University police departments are concentrating their manpower to find the man who raped a University student last week and to help assuage concerns about safety in the University area. Charlottesville Police Chief J.


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Council members implement legislative structure changes

For the first time in several years, Student Council is undergoing a major structural change that will split representatives into three teams to develop a cohesive plan for the coming semester. Although the idea has been in the works since last year, this fall marks the first use of the new structure.


News

Student escapes attack, leads police to suspect

Just four days after an armed break-in and rape in the Venable area, another University female student was sexually attacked while inline skating at Azalea Park Monday afternoon. According to police, the victim, a quick-thinking 17-year-old University student, averted potential rape and assisted in her assailant's prompt arrest by screaming for help. The victim allegedly was approached by Buckingham County resident Tyrone Nathaniel Jones while removing her skates in her van at the park, police said.


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Students seek new governing body for fraternities, sororities

The Office of the Dean of Students is coordinating an effort to create a fourth governing council for fraternities and sororities. The proposed new council is an attempt to accommodate those fraternities and sororities that do not necessarily fall under existing fraternal councils, Asst.


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Officials plan to promote safety

Following two recent attacks near Grounds, members of the University community said they are working together to create a safer living environment and to prevent further sexual assaults. An armed burglary and rape occurred Thursday in the Venable neighborhood and an attempted sexual assault took place Monday in Azalea Park (see related stories, A1). While a suspect was arrested in connection with Monday's attack, last Thursday's assailant remains at large. Leonard Sandridge, executive vice president and chief financial officer, said the University is continuing its efforts to prevent attacks.


News

College anticipates long-awaited media studies major

Budding journalists, filmmakers, television producers and other media buffs at the University soon may find a new home in a proposed interdisciplinary major, media studies, which might be implemented as early as the fall of 2001 or 2002. While the media studies degree still has a few hurdles to clear before it becomes a full-fledged major, it has picked up some momentum from the hiring of Director Johanna Drucker last spring. Plans for the program have been in the works since 1995, and while the major will not be official until 2001 or 2002, the core classes may be available in the fall of 2000. By that timetable, interested students who are currently first and second years will be able to major in media studies.


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University readies for Y2K bug

Students need not worry about the ISIS man going on the fritz January 1, 2000. University computing officials say computers around Grounds, including the Integrated Student Information System computers, are ready to handle the Year 2000 problem. The Y2K problem became a major worry because many computers are programmed to know only the last two digits of a given year. Therefore, some computers recognize the year 2000 as 1900, and massive complications could arise when the new year begins. "We are completing a multi-year preparation for the Y2K event," said Dr. Robert Reynolds, interim director of information technology and vice provost for the Health Sciences Center.


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E-School updates labs, software, curriculum

University computing facilities just received a much-needed software upgrade to serve student needs and enhance the computer science curriculum. This month, Information Technology and Communication installed mainly Microsoft Office 2000 and Visual Studio 6.0. The University previously used Microsoft Office 97-Professional Edition before making the upgrade this summer, said Tony Townsend, who is part of ITC's Computing Support Services.


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Student groups begin move into new offices

Members of student organizations formerly housed in Peabody Hall will spend their first days on Grounds unpacking boxes, setting up computers and decorating walls-and that's just in their office space. This week, about a dozen student organizations will move into new office spaces around Grounds due to their eviction last spring from Peabody Hall.


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Turkey quake strands some U.Va. students

Following the devastating Aug. 17 earthquake in Turkey that claimed over 13,000 lives and crippled the Turkish economy, University officials are making an effort to aide Turkish international students and ensure their safe return to Grounds. Asst.