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Board unanimously supports considering race in admissions

After spending several hours in closed session Saturday, the Board of Visitors unanimously passed a resolution stating that it supports the University's current use of race in admissions and is willing to defend the policy in court. The resolution also refuted the claim that minority students are admitted with lower standards, stating that "every student admitted under our policies is qualified to attend." The resolution endorsed University President John T.


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Admissions debate continues despite Board's resolution

Although the Board of Visitors passed a resolution Saturday supporting the University's current admissions policies, members of the University community remain divided about whether race should be considered in the admissions process. Office of African-American Affairs Dean M.


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Students given access to local company's database

Students in the Engineering and Commerce Schools now will have access to a large database of information on banks, thrifts, insurance companies and real estate investment trusts, thanks to a gift from Charlottesville-based SNL Securities. SNL Securities is a local high-tech research and publishing company, which specializes in the financial industry.


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Council discusses race in admissions

Student Council intended to vote on two resolutions dealing with affirmative action last night. But semantics inhibited their procedures and after five hours Council had not voted or debated on the resolutions - after spending the majority of their meeting amending the resolutions and debating whether to discuss them at all. The issue of affirmative action has engulfed the University in recent weeks after the Virginia State Conference National Association for the Advancement of Colored People called for Virginia Gov.


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ADAPT aims to increase peer alcohol education

The University's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Team is looking at substance abuse prevention programs to assess the need for increased peer education. ADAPT was created by the Institute for Substance Abuse Studies last spring as a result of the University's 1998 Alcohol Task Force, which looked into ways to prevent alcohol abuse at the University. Through the utilization of peer educators, three subcommittees within ADAPT will focus on promoting awareness, providing educational outreach and serving as an accessible resource for students. University students also play a key role in ADAPT. "On issues like alcohol, students have a better understanding of how to relate to fellow students ... they've been there," Dean of Students Penny Rue said. Last semester, the Institute for Substance Abuse studies recruited 14 students to train to be ADAPT peer educators. The ADAPT peer educators include "members of the Greek system, members from every class, transfer students and resident advisors," said Alison Houser, Prevention Programs and Services interim director.


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Campaign planners salute local donors

The leaders of the University's Capital Campaign gathered with members of the University and Charlottesville community yesterday to acknowledge and support the Campaign's local donors. The event, which was held at the residence of C.


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Studies show teens at high risk for STDs

Despite increased attention to the dangers of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, recent studies show many sexually active teens are ignorant of the true risks of potentially hazardous sex habits. According to a national study by Bruce Jancin in OBGYN News, 40 percent of sexually active teenagers have never discussed STDs with a partner, 43 percent do not use condoms during intercourse, and an even greater 55 percent do not discuss STDs with their current partners. While most members of the University community have passed their teen years, the student population is not immune to these statistics. Although cases of HIV and AIDS are rarely reported at the University's Student Health Center, other STDs are still commonplace and potentially very dangerous. According to Dr. Christine Peterson of Student Health's Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, STDs such as chlamydia and Human Papilloma Virus are quite common on college campuses. Every sexually active woman who visits a gynecologist, for example, is tested for chlamydia. "The chlamydia rates have dropped recently and HPV rates have risen," Peterson said.


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Rooney to deliver Valediction speech

The gruff wit of "60 Minutes" correspondent Andy Rooney will be on display at valedictory exercises this spring. The Emmy Award-winning CBS newsman has agreed to be the keynote speaker during graduation May 20, University officials announced yesterday. Rooney was the first choice of the Graduation Committee, said Puja Seam, fourth-year College student and Class of 2000 Trustees Graduation Committee chairwoman. "We were really surprised how quickly he responded," Seam said.


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Student assaulted in McCormick area

University Police are investigating a report that a female University student was sexually assaulted in the McCormick Road residence area early Friday morning. The student reported she had met the assailant late Thursday evening and was acquainted with him at the time of the assault, which occurred at about 4:14 a.m.


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Officials push for computer engineering degree program

Computer engineering will be offered as a degree program next fall -- if the computer science and electrical engineering departments get their way. Since January 1997, the Engineering School has had a computer engineering program but not a separate computer engineering major, Engineering Prof.


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Minority office wins accolades from President Clinton

The Engineering School's Office of Minority Programs has been attracting national attention -- and now a Presidential Award -- with its efforts to increase the recruitment, retention and graduation rate of minority students. The Office uses a variety of recruitment methods and mentorship programs, including a weeklong residential program for rising high school juniors and seniors, a summer bridge academy for first years, professional internships and research projects with University faculty. Carolyn Vallas, director of the Office for Minority Programs, said such efforts are necessary because minorities are underrepresented in engineering programs at the University and across the nation. President Clinton recently honored Vallas and the Office of Minority Programs with the 1999 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring.


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UJC expands list of possible trial chairs, clarifies bylaws

In an effort to clarify procedural questions which arose during the Kory v. Smith, Kintz and Tigrett case last spring, the University Judiciary Committee unanimously passed a bylaw Sunday night which allows any Committee representative to chair a trial. Before the change, nothing in the bylaws specified who could or could not chair trials, but traditionally only vice chairpersons and the Committee chairman have served as trial chairs. "The bylaws are sort of vague in this area," UJC Chairman Brian Hudak said.


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Admissions to use new system

As the University's Office of Admissions prepares to begin reviewing prospective students' applications in the next few days, officials no longer will be using a weighted scoring system to rate applicants.


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Alumnus gives students consulting tips

Chris Bierly, vice president of Bain & Company and 1986 University alumnus, spoke to students enrolled in "Strategic Management Consulting," COMM 460a, Friday about what they could expect from the consulting field. Boston-based Bain & Company is one of the world's leading global strategy consulting firms. Bierly told students he recognizes that management consulting is an ambiguous term and he defined it simply as one company giving advice to another company. "There are two parts to management consulting -- the first is expertise providers who take information from company to company and the second, strategy consulting, helps top management in companies decide where they would like their companies to go and designs initiatives to help companies get from point A to point B," he said. Bain & Company now employs more people with bachelor's degrees than MBA's.


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Lambeth stairs will be redone

Students living at Lambeth Field Apartments will be on more stable ground in upcoming years when the Housing Division completes its plans to rebuild all exterior staircases in the complex. Officials plan to replace the weather-worn structures in two phases over the next two summers.


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Report outlines methods to curb teen pregnancy

Nearly every day a girl between the ages of 10 and 19 in Charlottesville and Albermarle County gets pregnant, according to the local Council on Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention. In response to such statistics, the Task Force on Teen Pregnancy Prevention issued a report Friday recommending cost-effective, preventative programs for families, churches, schools, businesses, service groups and health care professionals. The task force was created two years ago as the result of a Charlottesville-Albermarle County town meeting entitled "Partners in Teen Pregnancy and STD Prevention." The task force includes six University faculty members, and other professionals from a wide range of community groups in the area. The task force also is addressing a compilation of studies that show teenage mothers are more likely to have complications with childbirth, depend on public welfare, never complete high school, have fewer employment skills and raise a family in poverty. One of the task force's primary recommendations is to expand existing programs that have proved effective in preventing teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Although there are some effective programs out there, they are not being used enough, said Jack Marshall, task force chairman and a retired international consultant on family planning.