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Program promotes nursing

A Nursing student and a Charlottesville resident have created a program in the School of Nursing that will provide health services to countries that lack adequate medical facilities. Third-year Nursing student Matthew Walden along with Charlottesville resident Rodney Hughes created the group, called Nurses Without Borders, late last semester.


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Study indicates high levels of stress for college students

First-year college students feel more stressed now than ever before, according to a nationwide study released this week by the University of California-Los Angeles. Out of over 360,000 first-year college students surveyed, 30 percent reported being "frequently overwhelmed" by all they have to do.


News

Classes cancelled?

Although Gov. James S. Gilmore III (R) declared a state of emergency in Virginia yesterday because of a storm that unexpectedly dumped more than eight inches of snow on the Commonwealth, University officials decided to hold classes and conduct business as usual. The snowstorm quickly made its way to the East Coast, dumping more than 10 inches of snow in the Richmond area, 14 inches at the North Carolina border, and shutting down the federal government in Washington, D.C. Although climatologists said this was the worst storm to hit the East Coast since 1996, Charlottesville accumulations reached only eight inches. Leonard W.


News

Institute of Substance Abuse Studies decides on new name

Gradual changes in the mission of the University's Institute for Substance Abuse Studies have led it to rename itself the Center for Alcohol and Substance Education. Originally founded in 1987 primarily as a research center, CASE became a prevention and education organization as time passed, CASE Interim Director Alison Houser said. "Over the years the office has evolved to better serve the needs of the University," Houser said.


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Off-Grounds housing sprawl may contribute to 'slumization' of city

College students move in, rents go up and middle-class families move out: A scene that has been played over in college towns across the nation and in the city of Charlottesville, according to Charlottesville Mayor Virginia Daugherty. University students who seek off-Grounds housing are a potential cause of "slumization," a phenomenon that once affected cities like Chicago and New Haven, Conn., the hometowns of the University of Chicago and Yale, repectively, as a result of college students who can pay higher rents encroaching on formerly middle-class areas, Daugherty said.


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Students suggest new 'wellness dorm'

Members of the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Team are proposing the creation of a new "wellness dorm" that would cater to students interested in healthier living. ADAPT hopes the wellness dorm will provide a substance-free environment where students can participate in programs that will contribute to healthy lifestyles, ADAPT Peer Educator Marc Olsen said.


News

Building codes, state laws back living standards

The toilet just flooded, the heat doesn't work, the screen door has been hanging on its hinges since move-in day: For which of these problems is a tenant allowed to take action against his landlord? According to Charlottesville building code, a landlord is required to fix things that break - but within reason. If serious things remain unfixed, the tenant may take action, and in extreme cases, even sue. That means the toilet and the heat must be seen to, but the screen door may continue to hang on its hinges.


News

E-school offers new major degree

The Engineering School now is offering students the option of a degree in computer engineering, officials announced yesterday. The Engineering School has been planning to offer a degree in this field for several years, and had been waiting for approval from the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, Engineering School officials said.


News

Goode leaves Democrats for

U.S. Rep. Virgil Goode (I-5th) announced yesterday that he is leaving the Democratic Party and will run as an Independent in the upcoming November election.


News

Former student alleges honor discrimination

Former student Ayola Greene filed a lawsuit Jan. 1 seeking $10.5 million against the University and the Honor Committee for racial discrimination and violating her constitutional due process rights. Greene, who had her degree rescinded in May 1995 for failure to pay bad checks, filed her case in Federal District Court seeking $8 million in punitive damages, $2.5 million in compensatory damages plus attorney's fees and lost wages. Three cases involving the honor system now are pending against the University. Greene's brief alleges racial discrimination in the case because Greene was described as black on the Honor Committee's "case status form." "African-Americans are more likely to be brought up on Honor Committee violations and found guilty of such then are any other group at the University," the brief states. The suit also alleges the Committee violated Greene's constitutional rights by not notifying her of the trial date and therefore taking her degree and depriving her of property "without due process pursuant to the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments." Greene received her Bachelor's degree in Architecture from the University in the spring of 1992.


News

Fraternities, sororities report consistent rush participation

Despite brutal winter weather and contention over formal fraternity rush's move to the spring, both fraternity and sorority officials have reported spring rush numbers consistent with past years. According to Inter-Fraternity Council Treasurer Tim Roscoe, the IFC has formally registered 491 men interested in participating in rush. However, IFC President Wes Kaupinen said the registration numbers may be low compared to the actual number of men visiting houses because not all rushees registered before Open House weekend. "The IFC is encouraged by the strong turnout we've seen so far," Kaupinen said.


News

Gore crushes Bradley, Bush leads GOP pack

Vice President Al Gore (D) won a strong victory over former Sen. Bill Bradley (D) in last night's Iowa caucases for the Democratic Presidential nomination, coming in with 64 percent of the votes to Bradley's 35 percent.


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Senate revises food, service at Garden Room

In an attempt to increase revenue, the Faculty Senate and University Dining Services hope to draw more hungry faculty members to the Garden Room with changes to its service and menu. Faculty Senate Chairman David T.


News

City Council discusses possible Mall changes

The Downtown Mall, aged from 20 years of weather and traffic, soon may be getting a facelift. Charlottesville City Council has been discussing whether to renovate the surface of the Downtown Mall for several years and recently hired a consultant to determine the urgency of the situation, Director of Public Works Judith Mueller said. "We've known over the years it's been deteriorating," Mueller said. The project would take about two years to complete and cost over $1 million, City Councilman Blake Caravati said. But Council will wait for the results of the consultant's investigation before deciding to go ahead with the pricey renovation. Mueller said she expects to know more about the consultant's investigation in a few weeks. Charlottesville Mayor Virginia Daugherty said the project needs to be started soon because the Mall "is already in dire need of resurfacing." Caravati said Council already has anticipated the renovations and has been setting aside money for the past three years to pay for the project. "But it will be a couple of years before anything can happen" because of the high cost of the construction, he said. The majority of the brick on the Downtown Mall surface dates back to 1976, though some portions are as new as 1982, he added. Vice Mayor Meredith Richards said brick is a high-maintenance material and that the Mall's surface has had several decades of wear. "It's in very serious need of replacement," Richards said.


News

Elmo regains FOA after year absence

St. Elmo Hall fraternity, known nationally as Delta Phi, rejoined the Inter-Fraternity Council Friday when the Office of the Dean of Students reinstated its Fraternal Organization Agreement. The University Judiciary Committee revoked Elmo's FOA -- which establishes a fraternity's affiliation with the University and the IFC -- in the spring of 1998 after the chapter was found guilty of serving alcohol to minors.


News

Raging Bull shares stock

The Alta Vista company, a leading online media and commerce site, announced Monday Nov. 29 that it acquired Raging Bull, a financial-oriented Web site with stock quotes, news and message boards. Alta Vista acquired Raging Bull for an undisclosed sum.


News

Innovative site offers free music space

University alumni once again are making a name in the Internet world. A new online music company called Myplay.com is adding to the cutting edge of the industry by offering free digital music storage. University alumni Michael Crotty and Matt Fischer are executives at MyPlay, joining the ranks of alumni who have started Web sites like Bullseye.com, which offers online tips for investors. Crotty, the vice president of manufacturing at Myplay, graduated from the Commerce School in 1987.


News

250 prospective

Two hundred fifty third-year students have applied to live in one of 48 rooms on the Lawn in the upcoming academic year -- an increase from previous years. A number of initiatives have caused the increase in applications, said M.

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