Jun 28, 2017



LIFE

The grass under your feet

For some University students, the term 'a person for all seasons' applies not just to their personalities, but to their feet as well. When not in facilities that require shoes to be worn, some students like to stroll barefoot - even with the weather turning colder and colder.

"Going barefoot isn't really as big a deal as people often act like it is; your feet adjust quite quickly," first-year Adam Campbell said. "Honestly, when it started getting colder, my feet were the only part of me that weren't cold, presumably because they've adjusted to being exposed. I'll probably be wearing something on my feet for the rest of the winter, if only to not stand out."

Campbell explained that his bare feet were inspired when he and his friends at home noted how much they enjoyed being barefoot and questioned why they did not walk naturally more often.

"I've always liked the feel of walking barefoot, but it was sometime during the last school year that it became more of a norm," he said. "It didn't really affect [me] much before coming to U.Va., because at home I drove most places, and there's nothing odd about being barefoot once you're actually at home or a friend's. It's only now that I walk everywhere that it's any more."

Denise Berlot - who graduated from the College last fall -


Published January 24, 2011 in Life









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Barefoot Hiker
(12/31/69 7:00pm)
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Very interesting article. Research over the years indicates that barefoot walking is by and large better for the feet than wearing shoes. Shoes are useful "tools," so to speak, when conditions call for them, but over-reliance on shoes can bring a lot of problems, such as weakened musculature in the feet. An article about barefoot hiking should be available by clicking on "Barefoot Hiker," above.

It is unfortunate that something as natural and healthy as walking barefoot has been relegated to the realm of "dirty" in some people's minds. In fact, shoes provide the perfect incubator for fungi to breed (dark, moist and unventilated), whereas the air and sunlight that bare feet provide natural and effective antifungal protection. Contrary to popular belief, it is not so much walking barefoot in a locker room, for example, that leads to athlete's foot - it's putting socks and shoes back on before the feet have had ample time to dry.

As someone who has hiked thousands of miles barefoot, I can attest to the physical, mental and even spiritual benefits of walking barefoot. Being barefoot to exercise, study, engage in recreational activities or even for work & study can lift one's mood and provide a sensory experience that some value as much as they value the sense of touch in their hands. In some ways, it can be a kind of drug-free "antidepressant."

Thanks for the article!


Daniel Howell
(12/31/69 7:00pm)
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So wonderful to see how 'barefooting' is slowing becoming normal. Going sans shoes is so much healthier and for many of us more enjoyable!


Christopher Burrell
(12/31/69 7:00pm)
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Having just run the Carlsbad Marathon barefoot yesterday, I feel I can safely say that shoes are for people who do not know how to use their feet.


Rockime
(12/31/69 7:00pm)
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Now all we have to do is get rid of the "No Shirt, No shoes, No Service" signs that adorn many business outlets. They have no relation to health codes and became particularly popular in conservative establishments during the Hippy Era.



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