The Cavalier Daily
Serving the University Community Since 1890

News


News

Fogarty aids Vatican with WWII probe

Calling on the expertise of a University religious studies professor, the Vatican in Rome has launched a probe into the Catholic Church's role in anti-Semitism during the World War II era and, specifically, whether then-Pope Pius XII could have done something to alleviate the Holocaust. The University's Rev.


News

Publicity decreases applicant numbers

Following this year's drop in the number of admissions applications from black prospective students, administrators, faculty and students are expressing concern about an increasingly strained racial atmosphere at the University. The University received 326 fewer black student admissions applications for the class of 2004, a significant 25.3-percent drop from last year, as well as a 16-percent overall drop in applications. The applications drop came on the heels of a year-long debate surrounding the validity of the University's current admissions practices, which use race as a factor. Board of Visitors member Terence P.


News

College Advisory Board decides on new name

Citing confusion among University students about the identity and role of the College Advisory Board, the CAB voted to rename itself the Arts and Sciences Council in a meeting Wednesday. "We changed the name to serve the students of the College of Arts and Sciences so that they know who we are and can access our services," said Matt Rose, president of the College. The Council is a representative body of College students.


News

Honor votes to form Review Commission

After two sessions of strong debate, the Honor Committee passed a proposal to create an Honor System Review Commission Sunday night by a 10-3-1 vote. The new Commission will analyze all aspects of the Committee's bylaws and is charged with finding ways to simplify investigative and trial procedures. The new Commission will consist of three former and/or current members of the Committee, four University alumni, faculty and/or administration and the 2000-2001 Committee Chairman, as well as two additional members of the 2000-2001 Honor Committee.


News

Meningitis cases strike University of Richmond

This past week, two students from the University of Richmond contracted meningitis, a potentially fatal disease that causes inflammation of the lining around the brain and spinal cord. "The University [of Richmond] has taken certain steps to make sure other students do not get this disease," University of Richmond spokesperson Brian Eckert said.


News

Architecture faces office space crunch

The School of Architecture is stepping up its efforts to build more office space for faculty members after receiving warning citations from the National Architectural Accrediting Board and the Landscape Architectural Accrediting Board. The citations carry the threat of a possible loss of accreditation if more space is not constructed. The Architecture School is under a five-year accreditation term and is evaluated at the end of each term. According to Architecture School Dean Karen Van Lengen, the school was cited twice in the last 10 years - at the end of each evaluation period - for insufficient space. University Architect Samuel "Pete" Anderson said a "feasibility study" was completed last month to examine the possibilities for construction. At that time, officials began laying out the plans for a new building that would include about 25 offices. But the Architecture School cannot begin more concrete plans until it attains the necessary funding from private donations. Anderson said he does not expect construction to begin for at least another three or four years. According to Anderson, dealing with the space issue, although important, is not an emergency situation. "By no means would I say they have to [add office space] or they'll lose their accreditation," NAAB Executive Director Elliott Pavlos said.


News

Coffee shops attract unique clientele

With three major Corner District coffee shops competing for business from caffeine lovers, Espresso Corner, Espresso Royale Caffe and Starbucks have turned to different strategies to cater to their own type of customer. "We offer a classical environment which differentiates us from our competition," Ty Harris, manager of Espresso Royale Caffe said.


News

Council hears funding requests

Student Council released funding requests from 161 Contracted Independent Organizations Friday. While some CIOs like the Chess Club, which did not request any funding, are planning shoestring budgets for the coming year, many have followed the $30,000 example of the Virginia Women's Chorus, pushing the total allocations requests to $764,681.51.


News

University looks at recruiting options

Despite deciding not to seek state funding for a proposed summer outreach program for minority prospective students, the University will continue to develop minority recruitment programs, University President John T.


News

Bronfman addresses 'Judaism crisis'

Edgar Bronfman, president of the World Jewish Congress and chairman of the International Board of Governors of Hillel, spoke in Wilson Hall Friday about the current "unnoticed crisis" in Judaism and his plan to start a "Jewish Renaissance." "There are two main crises in Jewish life.


News

Victim reports robbery near 11th Street lot

A female University Health System employee reported she was robbed at gunpoint in an 11th Street parking lot early Wednesday morning. The off-duty nurse from the X-ray department said she was robbed around 1 a.m.. "She was walking to her car, and a black male pulled a gun on her and took her purse" said Charlottesville Police Sergeant Greg Davis. The suspect fled the scene on foot with the victim's purse, which contained less than $1 and some other items, said Charlottesville Police Sergeant Jim Pace. No injuries were reported. Charlottesville Police described the suspect as a "young black male in his twenties" about "5 foot 8 with medium build," Pace said.


News

Court dismisses $31 million baby- switching lawsuit

University Medical Center officials expressed relief after a Stafford County Circuit Court judge Thursday dismissed the $31 million dollar lawsuit filed by Paula Johnson, the mother of one of two babies switched at birth at the Medical Center over four years ago. Johnson's lawsuit named 17 physicians and nurses, including Medical Center Chief of Staff Thomas Massaro and Robert Cantrell, vice president and provost of health sciences, claiming fraud, negligence and violation of constitutional rights. In a 16-page decision, Circuit Judge James Haley Jr.


News

Alumnus lectures on impeachment

Former U.S. Senate Legal Counsel Thomas Griffith spoke at the Law School yesterday about his involvement in the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton. Clinton was put on trial last year for obstruction of justice and perjury in connection with his relationship with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky. Griffith, a Law School alumnus, was a mediator between Congress, Clinton's attorneys and the Supreme Court Chief Justice during the proceedings.


News

Minority program loses funding bid

The University will not seek state funds for a proposed outreach program designed to prepare minority students for study at the University, according to Nancy Rivers, director of state and government relations. The University requested state funding for the program in September, but in December Governor James S.


News

IFC selects Saunders as new president

The Inter-Fraternity Council elected its 2000-2001 executive board last night, naming third-year Kappa Alpha fraternity member Justin Saunders president. Saunders said he hopes to focus the IFC's attention on rush next year. "We want to improve formal rush so that we can increase our numbers for next year," he said. He added that the IFC will continue to advocate the return of formal rush to the fall. Another Kappa Alpha member, second year Josh Johnson, was chosen as vice president for party patrol. Johnson said the IFC's self-regulation of parties has been working very well.