Four UJC referenda aimed at clarifying ambiguities, language in constitution pass

Individual referenda received between 79-85 percent of vote

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UJC chair and fourth-year College student Mitchell Wellman told The Cavalier Daily in a prior interview that he did not expect much controversy surrounding the passage of these amendments.

Cavalier Daily

All four of the University Judiciary Committee’s referenda up for consideration in this year’s election passed. The amendments were aimed at updating language and clarifying ambiguities in the UJC constitution.

The first amendment, which expands categories specifically protected by the Sanction Enhancement Clause of the UJC constitution by adding gender identity, marital status and family medical or genetic information to the constitution, received 82.41 percent of the vote.

The second amendment, which will update the UJC constitution to include more gender-inclusive language by replacing instances of the words “his,” “he” or “chairman” with “his or her,” “he or she” or “chair,” respectively, passed with 83.4 percent of the vote.

The third amendment, which updates the constitution with respect to vacancies on UJC’s elected representative body, received 79.12 percent of the vote.

The fourth and final amendment, which will eliminate ambiguity in the steps required to propose future amendments, passed with 85.12 percent of the vote.

UJC chair and fourth-year College student Mitchell Wellman told The Cavalier Daily in a prior interview that he did not expect much controversy surrounding the passage of these amendments.

“Our [referenda] are housekeeping measures about ensuring the consistency and integrity of our constitution, and I think that’s a value most people can get behind,” Wellman said. “I don’t see a lot of window for controversy.”

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