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University helps schools meet SOLs

The University's Continuing Education program is now helping Virginia schools to better integrate the state's Standards of Learning curriculum. The Virginia Department of Education set forth the SOL curriculum under Virginia Gov.


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Studies show rise in college-age smokers

When University students light up, they join the growing ranks of about four million college-aged smokers throughout the country. Although smoking is not a new phenomenon at colleges and universities, many health care professionals are worried to see increasing numbers of college students who smoke. A study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health found that the number of smokers at 116 colleges rose by 28 percent between 1993 and 1997. At the University, a survey conducted by the Department of Psychiatric Medicine in the spring shows 34.8 percent of University students reported using tobacco in the last 30 days, with 15.4 percent having done so on 40 or more occasions. These statistics alarm many in the health care profession. "This is a crucial pressing issue that continues ... on all college campuses," said Susan Tate, director for Health Promotion at the Elson Student Health Center.


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Candidates debate area's social issues

Local candidates for this fall's General Assembly elections demonstrated clear ideological differences as they debated the role of government in social programs in an issue forum hosted by the Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy last night.


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Students evaluate motives for race-based housing decisions

When third-year College student Michael McPheeters, a Chatam, Va., native, entered the University in the fall of 1997, he lived in McCormick Road dormitories, a predominantly white residence area. McPheeters, now co-president of the University's Black Fraternal Council, said at the time he knew very few black students in the area and not until the year progressed did he meet many other black students at all. "Initially, when I started going out, I went out with white students.


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Council plans revitalize book exchange program on Internet

As the popularity of Internet trading sites such as eBay.com continues to grow, Student Council is hoping to join the trend by offering University students the ability to trade their used books online. Once established, the online book exchange will allow students to set their own prices for their used books, said Brock Jolly, Council vice president for administration. The program, set up as a joint effort by the online company Bookswap.com and Council, will allow University students to register and purchase used books from other University students. The online exchange also will "eliminate paper, be faster, and be an overall better program" than Council's old book exchange, he said. The old program required students to bring in their books and set specific prices for them.


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Officials call for more alcohol education for women

Despite the University's increased focus on preventing binge drinking in recent years, there still is a need for more programs specifically targeting female students, Women's Center Director Sharon Davie said. Binge drinking is defined as consuming four or more alcoholic beverages in a row for women, or five or more drinks in a row for men. Even though women are more vulnerable to the dangers associated with binge drinking, most alcohol abuse prevention is focused on men, Davie said. "My perception is that the stereotype is that men drink a whole bunch more than women, and ... in the overall scheme of things, it seems men would be targeted more" in prevention programs, she said. But roughly equal numbers of female and male students are treated for alcohol-related ailments at the Student Health Center, Director of Student Health James Turner said. Because women react differently to alcohol than men, some alcohol education programs should be directed at women, Turner said. "Women are less tolerant of alcohol, so they tend to get sicker sooner, so education effectively should be targeted specifically towards women," Turner said. Despite women's unique needs, Davie said she did not know of any binge drinking prevention programs at the University designed especially for females. But education is not necessarily the best way to prevent alcohol abuse by either gender, said Madeleine Chandler, Outpatient Psychiatry Services employee and registered nurse. "Education doesn't often" prevent binge drinking, Chandler said.


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Thief nabs Booker House computers

Upon arriving at the Booker House yesterday morning, public relations employees found that several pieces of computer and office equipment, valued at $32,135.19, were missing from the Madison Lane office. The Booker House accommodates the University's public relations services including Community Relations, News Service, State Government Relations, and University Relations offices. According to University Police Lt.


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Study indicates dorm choice along race lines

Alderman Road dormitories attract a more racially diverse student body than McCormick Road dormitories, according to statistics compiled by the University's Office of Institutional Assessment and Studies obtained by The Cavalier Daily. This year, 1,393 first-year students live in Alderman Road dormitories.


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Council appoints liaisons to work with student groups

In an attempt to improve relations between Student Council and the University community, Council has implemented a plan to send student liaisons to various student organizations as well as to the Board of Visitors and the Faculty Senate. The liaison system was created over the summer by a team of Council Executive Board members, who include Council President Taz Turner, Vice President for Administration Brock Jolly and Communications Director Brooke Brower.


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Rue, organizations plan to re-establish walking escorts

Recent violence in the Charlottesville area, including an armed rape last month, and increased use of the University Escort Service, has prompted several student groups to take initial steps to reinstate the Student Watch Service. The Student Watch Service, a student-run organization that provides volunteer walking escorts, did not renew its status as a Contracted Independent Organization this fall, Student Council College Rep.


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University faculty members may face challenging road to tenure

(This is the first of a two-part series about the faculty tenure process.) For the most part, University students are familiar with the word tenure and know that it somehow applies to some of their professors, but are unaware of exactly how difficult it can be to obtain. Economics Prof.


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City seeks to increase middle-class housing

(This is the second part in a three part series about Charlottesville's efforts to attract middle-income residents.) Attracting middle income residents and creating new homes go hand in hand, said Charlottesville officials as they continue efforts to increase available city housing. City officials are now considering large and small parcels of land throughout the town for residential development. "We need to create more choices for people," City Councilman David Toscano said. City Council already has heard preliminary plans for the construction of the Wrenson Development Park, which would create about 120 residential units on the site of a former sewage treatment plant.


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U. Police report fewer alcohol-related arrests

According to University Police statistics on alcohol-related incidents released yesterday, four University students have been arrested for alcohol violations in the last three weeks, but several more have been referred to the University administration for violations of alcohol policy. University Police Lt.


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Lambeth stairs break apart beneath student

Lambeth Field residents received a jolt yesterday as a chunk of concrete fell from a flight of stairs in apartment building 467. Third-year College student Seth Evans said he was carrying laundry down the stairs from his second floor suite as the stair gave way underfoot. Evans, who was not injured, said his front foot was one step below, thus keeping him from falling with the stair.


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IFC, Rue discuss rush dates

Members of the Inter-Fraternity Council Executive Board met Friday with Dean of Students Penny Rue to discuss several issues now facing the fraternity system, including the effects of deferred rush on fraternity houses. IFC President Wes Kaupinen said he asked Rue whether rush dates were negotiable and how administrators would address the financial damages incurred by fraternities because of spring rush. Rue said she plans to evaluate the effects of spring rush on the fraternity system and the University community for several years before drawing a conclusion about rush dates. "There was a broad consensus among the University community to move rush, and it will take several years to determine whether [the move] is doing what the institution intended it to," she said. But Kaupinen said while the benefits of deferred rush remain to be seen, the benefits of fraternity membership are far-reaching. "There is concrete evidence that fraternity members and the structure and ideals of the fraternity system have repeatedly led to achievement at the University," he said.