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Ramazani, Maus receive Guggenheim award

Two University English professors, Jahan Ramazani and Katharine Maus, were recently honored by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation for their outstanding work in English literature. Ramazani and Maus are two of 182 scholars - and two out of only four recipients in the field of English literature - to receive the Guggenheim Fellowship.


News

Washington cleared of assault allegation

A Charlottesville General District Court judge dismissed misdemeanor assault charges against third-year Commerce student Ronnie Washington, Student Council executive vice president, at a Friday morning hearing. Washington had been charged with misdemeanor assault and battery after an incident that occurred March 2 at Jones' Wrecker, located at 420 West Main Street. The victim had alleged that Washington struck him during an argument when Washington came to retrieve his towed car. The alleged victim then obtained a warrant from the Charlottesville magistrate for Washington's arrest.


News

Celera leads race for human genome

Reaching a scientific milestone at least four months ahead of industry expectations, biotechnology company Celera Genomics Group announced Thursday it had taken the first step in unlocking the human genetic code by sequencing the complete genome.


News

NEH awards $1.01 million to professors

The National Endowment for the Humanities announced Wednesday that six grants, totaling $1.01 million, will be awarded to researchers at the University - marking the second largest amount the NEH has awarded to any single institution this spring. Through supporting projects that explore all aspects of American history, the NEH aims to offer Americans a better understanding of their cultural past. The NEH offers grants three times each year.


News

Noble condemns online college courses

David F. Noble, controversial higher education watchdog and history professor at York University in Toronto, spoke to about 30 professors and students yesterday afternoon in Ruffner Auditorium on the topic of online higher education. The author of several books and essays, including "Digital Diploma Mills: the Automation of Higher Education," Noble said he is particularly opposed to the computerization of university courses and electronic distance education. Vice Provost for Health Sciences Bob Reynolds introduced the speaker as "one of the most outspoken critics of distance learning." Noble focused his message on his belief that the elimination of the interpersonal aspects of the university experience degrades the quality of the education, especially because the goal of the educators becomes "profit" rather than "pedagogy." He began his speech with a brief history of what he called the "commoditization of higher education." As early as the 1890s, proponents of correspondence learning argued that using letters to communicate with teachers would soon eclipse traditional higher education by providing individualized and personalized attention to the student and added convenience, Noble said. He said the same arguments are used today by supporters of online universities. "The expectation of financial returns fueled by the extravagance of technological fantasies" has led to relaxation of legal safeguards and sound financial management, he added. Noble also spoke extensively on his work to expose the controversy over a contract between UCLA and the Home Education Network (now called OnlineLearning.net), a private company that provides university courses on the Internet.


News

Georgia suspends ATO for hazing

University of Georgia officials said the death of Georgia sophomore Benjamin Folsom Grantham III in a traffic accident last week was related to a fraternity hazing incident. Grantham, an Alpha Tau Omega pledge, was riding in the cargo area of a sports utility vehicle driven by a fellow fraternity member when the vehicle flipped over and hit a tree.


News

Jury convicts Davis of rape, robbery

A jury returned six guilty verdicts against Montaret Davis and recommended a sentence of 90 years in prison yesterday after almost seven hours of deliberation. Davis faced felony charges following his Oct.


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Students could face technology requirements

A joint resolution passed unanimously by the Virginia State Senate eventually could lead to a statewide technology curriculum at all Virginia public colleges and universities. The resolution calls for a group of government officials to study the possibility of developing a technology curriculum, which would include an across-the-board set of competency requirements for all students throughout the Commonwealth. "For a university to be a great university in the 21st century it has to be technologically advanced," Computer Science Dept.


News

California reports increase in minority admissions

The University of California system has admitted a number of minority students that surpasses pre-Proposition 209 levels for the first time since affirmative action was eliminated from its admissions process. In 1995, the UC Board of Regents decided to eliminate race and gender as a factor in admissions.


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Clinton administration hopes to increase NIH, NSF funds

The University stands to gain considerably from the 7 percent increase in national science research funding recently proposed by the Clinton administration. Congress currently is reviewing Clinton's Science and Technology Initiative, which was unveiled in the 2001 Federal budget proposal and supports a $2.9 billion increase in research funding over the 2001 fiscal year. "It's significant because it's higher this year.


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Research program secures $480,000 in funds

The Faculty Senate Undergraduate Research Awards are quickly growing into a well-funded program that some faculty members hope eventually will be a widely recognized part of the University's unique academic offerings. Faculty Senate Chairman David T.


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University purchases vacant lot on Emmet Street

In a quest to support future University growth and enhance the appearance of one of the University's major entry corridors, the University currently is in the process of buying a lot of land at the intersection of Emmet Street and Massie Road. One part of the lot lies near University Gardens, which is University housing for married students. The University wants to ensure that the land is not developed, which the city almost did about 35 years ago when it discussed building a road through the property, Board of Visitors Secretary Alexander "Sandy" Gilliam said. "The city had a misguided attempt to connect downtown Charlottesville to Emmet Street by connecting Emmet Street to Rugby Road," Gilliam said.


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Human Growth Hormone causes growing pains

One of the issues conference participants tackled was the use of Human Growth Hormone - a hormone found naturally in the human body which induces growth during childhood and adolescence. Consumers, the FDA and bioethicists have discussed the ethics and the controversies surrounding this elixir. At a Conference panel entitled Genetic Enhancements, Prof.


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Employee caught emptying meters

Police arrested 44-year-old University Parking and Transportation employee Ronald Gene Woodson yesterday after observing him removing change from a University parking meter without authorization, according to University Police Capt.


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Greek system concerned with diversity

Jack Warburton, former president of Pi Lambda Phi Fraternity, said only nine out of 40 members in Pi Lamb are minorities - yet Pi Lamb is one of the most ethnically diverse fraternities at the University. The reason for the under-representation of minority membership, according to Sitha Ngan, one of the few Asian brothers in Pi Lamb, is due to the low number of Asians, blacks and Latinos that rush the system in the first place. "Minorities don't rush because they are intimidated by the stereotypically white Greek system," Ngan said.

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Today, we sit down with both the president and treasurer of the Virginia women's club basketball team to discuss everything from making free throws to recent increased viewership in women's basketball.