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Chewning, Thomas to serve as Residence Life Co-Chairs

After a tough application process and a series of interviews, third-year College students Sarah Chewning and Katherine Thomas were selected as Residence Life Co-Chairs for 2000-2001. June 1, Chewning and Thomas will take over supervision of the Resident Staff Program, succeeding fourth-year students Jen Kyle and Esther Adams. "They have been wonderful," Adams said of Chewning and Thomas.


News

Council, Honor, UJC hopefuls debate issues

Candidates running for positions in Student Council, the Honor Committee and the University Judiciary Committee debated such issues as rush dates, funding for Madison House and the Honor Committee's single sanction in the Rotunda's Dome Room last night. Student Council presidential candidates Joe Bilby, Brendan Dignan, Michael McPheeters and Kevin Neher focused on the University's controversial decision to move rush to the spring. Candidate Matt Garrity was not present at the debate. Dignan condemned the administration's "arbitrary" decision to move rush to the spring and said Student Council should be an advocate of the Greek system. "It is imperative that the Student Council president articulate the vision of self-governance to the administration," he said. Bilby opposed Dignan's view, arguing that fraternities and sororities must demonstrate to the administration that they are "making concrete benefits to the University" in order to have their concerns addressed. "Student Council should play a minor role" in the resolution of the issue, he said. Neher advocated increased philanthropy on the part of the Greek system, but said he disagreed with the movement of rush to spring. "It's hard for me to tell first-year students that it is not their right" to make the decision to rush in the fall, he said. McPheeters advocated a student referendum on the issue and said Student Council should play a role in presenting the student body's opinion to the administration. "Whenever an issue faces the University community, Student Council representatives have to address it," he said. Candidates for Council Vice President for Organizations Kelly Harris, Nick Jabbour and Brian Maxted debated the topics of diversity within the Council Appropriations Committee and the fairness of the appropriations process. Harris said applications for a position on the committee should be reviewed to ensure a "fair mix of all ethnic representations." Jabbour said committee bylaws should be changed in order to guarantee representation from all factions of the University, such as athletics and service organizations. To make certain all organizations regard the appropriations process as fair, Maxted advocated better and earlier communication of appropriations deadlines and procedures. Candidates for College Honor Committee representative Ryan Blackledge, Thomas Hall, Forrest Jones and Ginny Rothschild all said they were in favor of removing the seriousness clause in cases of cheating and preserving the single sanction. The single sanction demands that any student who is convicted of lying, cheating or stealing must be expelled from the University. As it stands now, the seriousness clause allows student juries to find accused students not guilty on an academic cheating charge if they feel the offense is not serious enough. Candidates for the Judiciary Committee expressed views on how they feel the functioning of the Committee can be improved and how the bylaws can be made more accessible to the student body as a whole. Elections began last night, and will continue until 8 p.m.


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Keyes unlocks campaign goals

Known for impassioned speeches on moral integrity and the need for less government intervention in American citizens' lives, Republican presidential hopeful Ambassador Alan Keyes addressed a 600-person crowd in the Chemistry Auditorium yesterday about returning to self-government and the "effects of moral self destruction." Keyes said he believes people must "once again" be morally and socially responsible in order to take back power from the present government establishment. "Government is necessary as a reflection of our own faulty nature, [and] because we step over that line we need to be constrained by force," Keyes said.


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Board votes to stay out of rush dispute

The Board of Visitors unanimously passed a resolution Saturday declining to participate in setting fraternity and sorority formal rush dates. Fraternities have challenged the Office of the Dean of Students' decision to hold formal rush in the spring because of financial hardships. With spring rush, fraternity houses collect dues from pledges for one semester instead of an entire year.


News

Bridge Trading Center opens

Minus irascible brokers shouting amidst the torrent of flying paper, walk into the University's newest classroom and you may think you've stepped onto the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Promising to revolutionize the way the University teaches business and finance, the Bridge Trading Center was inaugurated Thursday in a reception at the Commerce School.


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Mayor discusses need for parking, housing in area

As students slowly move into neighborhoods once dominated by Charlottesville residents, off-Grounds housing is becoming a concern for City Council members. In the Newcomb Hall South Meeting Room Friday, the University's Echols Council hosted a panel to discuss these concerns and how housing affects students and community members. Charlottesville Mayor Virginia Daugherty said City Council sees resolving housing issues as a top priority. "The city wants to continue the excellent atmosphere that exists around the University," Daugherty said.


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Commerce school holds case challenge

The Commerce School hosted five teams from Australia, Canada, Denmark and the United States in its 19th annual McIntire International Case Competition in Monroe Hall Saturday with Mexico's Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey coming out on top. In a day marked by intense competition, Mexico's team won due to its presentation of the best solutions on a real life business problem -- the end product for which the event's coordinators had hoped. "They came up with a way to create a demand in foreign countries and possible different uses of the product," said fifth-year Commerce student Su Cheng, a member of the steering committee that organized the competition.


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BOV expands campaign goals

At the Board of Visitors meeting Saturday, Robert D. Sweeney, University vice president for development, described the next steps the University will take now that the Capital Campaign has reached its $1 billion goal. As of Friday, Sweeney said the Campaign total was $1.94 billion. The "Beyond a Billion" campaign includes soliciting alumni and parents to donate money before the end of the year.


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Three faculty members run for Charlottesville Council

The University is hoping to leave more than just an academic mark on the City of Charlottesville this spring, as three faculty members run for City Council positions. Elizabeth Fortune (R), associate dean of the School of Architecture, announced her candidacy last week.


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Georgetown copes with campus bigotry

In response to an unusually high number of hate crimes reported over the past several months at Georgetown University, a group of students has formed the Georgetown Unity Coalition. The hate crimes have blacks, homosexuals, Jews and other minority groups. The Coalition hopes to have a strong impact on administrative policies.


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University opposes admissions limit

University President John T. Casteen III met with the General Assembly House Education Committee Wednesday to defend the University's admissions policies regarding the ratio of in-state to out-of-state students. The discussion was in response to a bill that would prohibit the University from admitting more than 33 percent out-of-state students in 2001. The Committee voted earlier this month not to vote on the bill until next year. Del.


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IFC to require service hours from pledges

The Inter-Fraternity Council passed a proposal yesterday requiring all pledges to complete 10 hours of community service during their pledge periods. The IFC voted unanimously in favor of the proposal during its weekly presidents' council meeting. This semester's pledges will be the first to face the new requirement, but individual fraternity leaders also may decide to impose the rule on pledges who joined fraternities in the fall. IFC officers will encourage pledges to organize their own service projects but also will help coordinate service opportunities as needed. "I see service as something that can appeal to people of all different backgrounds, but in order to do that [the projects] should be something that they self-select," IFC Service Chairman-elect Patrick Barry said. The IFC plans to work closely with Madison House and the Virginia Service Coalition to sponsor service opportunities. "Fraternities [will not] need to hunt all around Grounds for service opportunities," IFC Service Chairman Peter Leary said. Pledges also will be allowed to count non-fraternity sponsored service activities as long as they document them appropriately. IFC members said they hope pledges will continue to serve the community after fulfilling the 10-hour requirement. Related Links IFC's homepage The program "will help instill the importance of service in the pledges and allow them to carry with them this importance throughout their three and a half years" as fraternity members, IFC President Wes Kaupinen said. IFC members said the new requirement formalizes a long-standing tradition of community service within the fraternity system. "Most fraternities already have service as a component of the pledge process, so we are reaffirming what's already there," said Mike Christopher, IFC vice president for judiciary. Although pledging already is time consuming, the service requirement will not be too difficult for pledges, IFC President-elect Justin Saunders said. The community service requirement is "something that won't add on time to the pledgeship, but [it will] improve the quality of what they're doing," Saunders said. Leary also said community service is a valuable way for pledges to spend time. "I can think of few things that are more important for pledges to be involved in," he said. IFC members hope the program will strengthen relationships between pledges and brothers, Saunders said. "The proposal itself focuses on pledges, but at the same time its implications are more far-reaching than just the pledges themselves," he said.


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Faculty, administrators finalize grants for research

Undergraduate researchers soon will enjoy a new source of funding, with the introduction of the Faculty Senate Undergraduate Research Awards. The Provost's Office has agreed to fund the awards for a three-year period, Faculty Senate Chairman David T.


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Spring ballot to exclude new Honor clauses

The latest Honor Committee referendum to get rid of the seriousness clause in honor cases involving academic cheating will not appear on next week's Student Council ballot, despite Committee members' vote in favor of the referendum Sunday. According to Article VII of the Honor Constitution - the article that governs amendments - any proposed change to the constitution must wait two to six weeks after being voted on by the Committee to be sent to referendum and voted on by the student body. Committee members said they had hoped to have the referendum to the students in time to be on the Council election ballot.


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Models connect technology, biology

As the new millennium begins, the computer and biological worlds are moving closer together. By some time this century, new techniques of DNA-based computing may allow computers to laugh at jokes and recognize the difference between cats and dogs.