The Honor Box: Honor provides two case summaries of most recent trials

Two students found not-guilty on basis of act, knowledge

The following public summaries of Honor Committee trials were provided to The Cavalier Daily by the Honor Committee. All identifying information has been removed from the summaries in order to protect the privacy of the individuals.

Public Summary: Trial 1

April 19, 2014

A student in the College of Arts and Sciences was accused of stealing another student’s iPhone. The case was reported by a school administrator. The Community argued that the Accused Student obtained and sold the phone for personal gain without permission from the phone’s owner and without consulting a third party to identify the phone, thus proving beyond a reasonable doubt that he committed the Act of Stealing. The Accused Student argued that he did not intend to steal the phone, and that he took the phone home in order to charge it to identify the owner. The Accused Student argued that he was unable to identify the owner due to the phone’s lack of a SIM card or other identifiable features, and thus he only sold the phone because he did not know he had any other options.

A panel of randomly-selected students found the Accused Student not guilty on the basis of Act and Knowledge.

Public Summary: Trial 2

April 19, 2014

A student in the College of Arts and Sciences was accused of cheating on a final exam by looking up answers on her cell phone. The case was reported by a student. The Community argued that the reporter’s eyewitness testimony that she observed a student two seats over from her take her cell phone out of a backpack, type on her phone, and erase answers on her final exam proved beyond a reasonable doubt that an Act of cheating occurred. The Accused Student argued that she had been misidentified, pointing to numerous discrepancies in the testimony. The reporter saw a student using a bluebook; the student used a green book. The reporter said the student used a pencil during her exam; the accused student used a pen. The student introduced evidence that her hair color does not match the color described by the reporter and that her clothing and accessories on the day of the exam, likewise, were different from those described by the reporter.

A panel of both randomly selected students and Honor Committee representatives found the Accused Student not guilty on the basis of Act and Knowledge.


Published April 28, 2014 in News





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