LETTER: Advocating for Dean Eramo

To President Teresa Sullivan:

We are writing today advocating for our advocate, Nicole Eramo. As her students, and as her friends, we feel it’s our responsibility to speak up on her behalf, especially when she has spoken up on ours so many times before. We are leaders because she’s helped make us leaders. We have the strength to stand up because she’s helped put us on two feet. In our darkest moments, Nicole has stood by us, felt for us, listened to us, given us her heart. How can we not do the same for her in her darkest moment?

In a time when our community is fractured by pain, anger and confusion, we ask that you keep our advocate close. Below, those of us who have felt her warmth and her guidance have signed on in support of her presence here, and shared a little of our personal experiences. We will let our names and our testimony speak. We are advocates because she advocated for us first. Now we stand for her.

Signed,

Her students, your students, & community supporters

Dear UVA Administration,

Of all the professors, deans, faculty and staff at the University of Virginia, Dean Nicole Eramo has made the most significant and, ultimately, the most positive impact on my life. Dean Eramo has truly saved my life. If it were not for her, I do not know if I could be alive today. When I came to Dean Eramo my first year, I was depressed and suicidal...I was barely hanging on. Dean Eramo was helpful and understanding and, above all, compassionate. She listened attentively to my story and provided me with several resources. At the time, I was scared and I felt alone and I was in no position to pursue legal or University action. Dean Eramo gave me the power to make my own decisions--something so small that made me feel like I finally had some sense of control in my life. Eventually, Dean Eramo put me in contact with Emily Renda and other members of One Less. This action alone was probably the best thing anyone has ever done for me. I can't imagine what my life would be like now if it were not for Nicole Eramo. She has changed everything for the better. She has made me a better person. She has helped me get through the most difficult time in my life and has been with me every step of the way. I have said it before and I will say it again and again--Dean Nicole Eramo is an asset to this university. I do not want to go to the University of Virginia if she is not a resource for students in need of help in the aftermath of sexual violence. There is no one more qualified or more capable of doing this job. Dean Eramo is above and beyond the best resource the University has.

- Jackie, Rolling Stone Interviewee

~~~

Dearest Dean Eramo,


I was saddened to see you portrayed in such a negative light. You truly have the most difficult job on grounds, and I respect and appreciate how you have performed it. My critique in Rolling Stone was not of you- it was of the administration as a whole. Your job is not to encourage reporting, it is to be an unbiased source of information. I appreciate the gravity of that task given how strongly you wish to make our community a safer place. However, I think it's time for the University to change; to create a more reporting-positive environment to show that there are tangible consequences to such horrible crimes. But until we change the rules the administrators such as yourself must adhere to, you must do your job as described. I understand and acknowledge these current limitations and plan to be a part of a constructive solution. I think highly of you and I always have; I hope that was not lost in this article.

With gratitude,
“Stacy,” Rolling Stone Interviewee

~~~

This statement is being submitted on behalf of the faculty and staff of the Maxine Platzer Lynn Women's Center. I would like to respond to the criticism of Nicole Eramo that was included in the Rolling Stone article published last week.

I work daily helping victims of sexual assault. So does Dean Eramo, whose job crosses over the administrative duties of her position, to the personal, gut-wrenching, difficult face-to-face compassion and pain of walking a person toward getting help. Nicole is superb at this. The person who wrote the article quite frankly has not sat in her chair, or perhaps she would know why a "neutral face" is sometimes necessary. If the listener joins the trauma when someone is in extreme distress while telling their story for the first time, it makes it impossible to help them in the moment. Nicole's job is to be compassionate and calming, not reactive, else she may amplify the victim's distress and make it impossible to move toward the practical steps side of reporting. Further, most victims have reactions to what happened to them that unfold over weeks and months. Those reactions include stages of ambivalence about not only how to respond, but even how to label what happened. Anger--at the University, the perpetrator, the person sitting across from them--is all part of the mix. Lashing out at Nicole is like shooting at the firemen trying to put out a fire in your house. She is the one who is tangibly there to shoot at -- it doesn't mean she deserves it.

Our current reporting system gives victim a choice in whether to go forward with a complaint after reporting because it is trying to balance the needs of justice with that of healing. Autonomy--regaining a sense of control and choice-- is critically necessary for recovering from rape. It makes for a messy justice system, but is integral to healing from trauma. Blaming Nicole personally for providing that choice, respecting the ambivalence of the person reporting so that they may come to a decision without coercion, simply reflects a lack of understanding of how trauma affects the victim. It also does a grave injustice to her personally. The University needs to publicly support her in every way possible. Please think about it. If we join such a grossly unfair crucifixion of our most dedicated, self-sacrificing person courageous enough to help victims who lash out at her in their distress, are we really promoting justice or fixing our all too-flawed system of dealing with sexual misconduct?

Margaret Edwards, Trauma Counselor

Maxine Platzer Lynn Women’s Center

~~~

“When I think of the administration at UVA, Dean Eramo comes to mind before anyone else. During my second year, I came out to the world as a survivor of rape, causing me to spiral downward into a place of darkness. I did not have to reach out to Dean Eramo, because she reached out to me first. She let me know that someone in the administration cared. She told me "I know it took so much courage to do what you did" and that she was moved by my story. She asked for my input on how to make policy and prevention work in the ODOS better. I was floored. My friends and family could tell me how much of a difference I made by sharing my story over and over, but when it came from a dean, it was different. It was empowering and it gave me hope. From then on, she did everything in her power to comfort me, support me, and ease my increasingly difficult time at school. I went to her office without appointments and she saw me without hesitation. I decided to take a semester off from school and she walked with me to her husband's office and stayed throughout the entire meeting with him. Because of that, I was able to withdraw for a semester in one single day. I doubt I would have come back to school here without her kindness then and continued support not only for me, but also for my fellow survivors and friends. She is passionate about her work, putting everyone before herself, and her selflessness deserves recognition and reward beyond measure. My experience at UVA would be far different and far worse, almost hopeless in some ways, if not for Dean Eramo. She's had our backs for so long. It's time we have hers.”

~~~

“My community is nothing without Nicole. She is my mentor, inspiration, and friend. Supporting survivors can be extremely emotional. She has taught me what it means to be an advocate for myself and for others. She has taught me that true student self-governance means engagement at all levels — our work cannot be done without one another, without administration, faculty, staff, and students.

We both fight the good fight, and I will not stop fighting and advocating for her.”

~~~

“Dean Eramo first called me on a Saturday morning, the day after I reported my rape. From that moment on, she became not only my biggest advocate, but also my support system during a very difficult time in my life. She was comforting, and made it clear that she would do all she could to help me in any way I needed. Over the next few months, she helped me tell my family, talk to my professors when I was struggling to keep up with school work, and supported my decision not to press charges. I found Dean Eramo to be professional, caring, and extremely competent at an extremely difficult job. I believe she is an asset to this university, and I would be upset if she was forced to resign, as many are suggesting.”

~~~

“I had an out-of-state stalker my first year, and Dean Eramo helped me stay in contact with the police. After deciding that it would be best for me to leave grounds for a few days to ensure that it was safe for me to be at UVA, Dean Eramo was one of the people who made me feel the most comfortable returning to grounds and continued to check in with me throughout the school year.”

~~~

“Simply put, Dean Eramo saved my life in the Spring 2014 semester. As a first year student, I was dealing with an abusive, stalking and manipulative ex-boyfriend who lived 1000 miles away, and she took me under her wing and got me help immediately. She was able to reach out to my professors so I didn't have to worry about school on top of everything else, and she immediately got me in to see the trauma counselor at the Women's Center without any waiting around to get off of a list. Her swift, thoughtful actions kept me afloat and helped me get to a point where I could thrive again. If it weren't for her support and advocacy, I am not sure I would still be here. Despite the fact that my abuser lived halfway across the country, she took his threats to my safety seriously and made sure I felt safe and supported at this school. I cannot begin to explain how much I appreciate Dean Eramo. To this day, I know if I need anything at all, I can reach out to her and she will always, always follow through and support me. Without her here at the University of Virginia, I would feel much less safe. She has given me the resources I needed and the courage now to speak out about what happened to me. I am forever grateful for her.”

~~~

“The Z Society asked me for a paragraph in support of Dean Eramo last spring. My contribution is pasted below, and my sentiments towards her work at UVa have not changed since.

'As an Associate Dean of Students and the Chair of the Sexual Misconduct Board, Nicole Eramo has one of the most uniquely challenging positions at our University. She supports students through the stressful and overwhelming process of recovery from personal trauma in an academic environment. With a caring heart and a fair hand, she has also overseen some of the most painful hearings and procedures intended to bring justice to the UVa community. UVa's system of justice for sexual assault survivors is far from perfect, but it is improving, largely thanks to Dean Eramo's tireless efforts. She is honest, personable, and open with students, many of whom are accustomed to administrators being distant and unapproachable. Because of the sensitive and personal nature of the subject matter, much of Dean Eramo's work goes unrecognized and unappreciated by the larger UVa community, but her efforts are essential to the recovery process of many student survivors and their loved ones. Our University community is a better place for her presence in it. Nicole Eramo is truly worthy of special recognition.'

It is true that UVa's response to sexual assault needs scrutiny and revision. However, publicly lambasting the one administrator who has worked most tirelessly against the culture of sexual assault at our school is not a constructive way forward. It would be a shame to ignore the many positive contributions she has made to our community."

~~~

“Dean Eramo, described in the Rolling Stone article as “[survivors’] best advocate and den mother,” has been the primary intake for all reports of sexual misconduct at UVA for 8 years. She is a bridge to resources for sexual assault survivors; an impassioned partner within the administration for the SVPC; and such a valuable service to UVA not only from her time she dedicates to individuals, but the quality of the work that she does. UVa and all of us need her here.”

~~~

“Dear President Sullivan and Rector Martin,

The Rolling Stone article has appropriately brought to light very troubling issues in how the University deals with sexual misconduct. It has been encouraging to see positive conversations and demonstrations on addressing these issues. It is concerning to see the calls for Dean Eramo to resign or be fired. In my many involvements with student health and safety at the University I have had the opportunity to meet Dean Eramo in many settings. She has been a vocal advocate for survivors and an excellent communicator to the student safety community about the actions the University can take in sexual misconduct cases. I have seen no evidence to suggest Dean Eramo has not been meeting her goals and obligations as the head of the Sexual Misconduct Board. In my final year at the University, I had the opportunity to see Dean Eramo at Take Back the Night. She sat through every story, even the ones that are critical of the University. She took each story personally and was very frustrated that these crimes continue to exist in our community. It was clear that she really cares and has dedicated her life towards helping survivors. She even helped me personally advocate for off-Grounds Blue Light Phones. She wants to enable students to be each other’s keepers. To lay blame and remove her from her position will only hurt the University. She would only serve as a scapegoat so that the University can clear this media storm and demonstrate action superficially. We need to have a measured and logical response on how the University plans on dealing with the shortcomings in our community. It needs to be clear that these issues are widely systemic and cultural failures. Our University, like many others, is dealing with inadequate policies that hamper our ability to help survivors and punish perpetrators of sexual misconduct. We need to use this opportunity to come together as a community and reflect on how we can improve education efforts on bystander awareness, consent, and appropriate care after sexual misconduct for the survivor. Increased transparency is needed on the legal constraints the University is under on how to adjudicate these cases as well. Finally, we need advocate for better policies on a national level. Dean Eramo would be a terrible resource to lose for the student safety community if we are to make meaningful change. I hope any action that is taken is not for maintaining reputation or image, but rather for increasing our abilities to make our community safer and more inclusive.”

~~~

“UVA has failed to adequately address the problem of student-on-student rape. Yes, many other colleges and universities are failing too, thanks in part to a thicket of legislation that pits Title IX requirements against the due process rights of accused students. But UVA still bears culpability for the suffering that happens on its Grounds. I think a major source of that suffering is a student culture where students don't look out for each other enough, and where survivors of sexual violence are stigmatized. This must change, and this change has got to start with the students.

Because of the tangled legal guidelines regarding campus sexual misconduct, and because of the deficiencies in compassion that mar UVA's student culture, Dean Eramo's job is nearly impossible, not to mention emotionally exhausting. Yet she still comes in, day after day, with grace and sensitivity and a devotion to students evidenced by middle-of-the-night phone calls and hospital visits.

I'd argue that Dean Eramo's professionalism and support for survivors mitigates UVA's problems with sexual violence. Things are bad, but without her, they'd be worse. Dean Eramo is an easy target for people who are angry about how UVA addresses sexual assault. While that anger is justified, Web comments vilifying Dean Eramo, and petitions demanding her resignation, are misguided. As UVA works to better defend and care for students who've been attacked, Dean Eramo will be an invaluable asset.”

~~~

“As a member of Resident Staff who has worked with several survivors of sexual assault, I have appreciated Dean Eramo's advocacy, dedication, and compassion in working with students I care about. While sometimes it can be difficult to recommend that a resident speak to a dean, I have never hesitated to contact Dean Eramo as a reference for advice or as someone to send a resident to, because she has always been there for her students. Her contributions have helped the entire Resident Staff program improve their handling of sexual assault issues and her support is invaluable to continuing this fight.”

~~~

“I had the pleasure of interacting more personally with Dean Eramo this past summer. While meeting with her at a leadership retreat, I was able to speak professionally, but also casually with her, and found that she was incredibly easy to talk to. Throughout our various interactions, her insight was continuously incomparable. Over the course of this arduous semester, Dean Eramo has been a source of support to student leaders on grounds, providing forums for discussion and guidance in uncertain territory. 

Outside of student leadership, I have always felt comfortable approaching Dean Eramo, and I know many people who have interacted with her without reservations. She is inviting, kind, admirable, and perceptive. It is a joy to know her and call her a role model.”

~~~

“The first administrator I was directed to when I considered taking a semester off was Dean Eramo. At a time when most are quick to blame the UVa culture for stress (e.g. 'we all struggle with difficult class loads,' 'I'm involved in a lot, too'), she was supportive without being dismissive. Though Dean Eramo is not a prominent presence in my life, she is a powerful one. I am thankful for the work she does and for the invaluable and immeasurable way that she positively affects her space.”

~~~

“Though I have no experience with Dean Eramo, I have heard sparkling reviews from other parties. I have talked extensively with representatives from the Charlottesville Sexual Assault Resource Agency.
From these ladies, whose expertise on the issue and knowledge of how to effectively help survivors likely exceeds the expertise of everyone directly involved in any decision that might be rashly made in the coming days, as well as from friends who have dealt with Dean Eramo personally, I have the highest of opinions for her and what she does for this community. It would be a crying shame to see her made scapegoat and let go.”

~~~

“I have been amazed to see Dean Eramo at many events that are off-grounds and not during the typical work day/work week. She is consistently professional but also consistently warm and approachable. She met with me recently, on the day the Rolling Stone article was released--surely a very difficult day for her--to discuss my concern for a friend in an abusive relationship. She was present and engaged the whole time and helped me figure out some ways to help my friend, including, if necessary, Dean Eramo reaching out to her. She is never too busy to care for a student, and without her, survivors and other students would be without an essential means of support and healing.”

~~~

“Dean Eramo is a massive asset to the University community. She deserves our care and support. I have personally felt the benefit of Dean Eramo's compassionate work this past semester. Dean Eramo helped me confront a difficult family situation that was seriously affecting my schoolwork. She worked quickly and efficiently to make sure my professors were knowledgeable and flexible about my situation. Furthermore, I have been amazed by Dean Eramo's competency surrounding the issue of sexual misconduct. In my capacity as a member of OneinFour, I have seen firsthand that she attacks the issue of sexual assault with a level-headed and effective approach. I have heard stories of Dean Eramo's care and capability from many friends who are survivors. Any action taken against Dean Eramo would be sorely misplaced. Scapegoating Dean Eramo would prove to many in the UVa community that our administration cares more about public relations than substance. This would be a disheartening conclusion. I hope that as a community we can rise about the politics of this situation and see clearly that Dean Eramo is one of our community's strongest advocates for survivors.”

~~~

“Dean Eramo is one of the most amazing individuals that I have had the pleasure of working with. She has one of the hardest roles at this University, and she does her work exceptionally without thinking twice. When I was speaking with her the other day after the Rolling Stone article, she continued to focus on the positive that might come of the situation instead of lingering on the negative or how she had been portrayed in the media. She stands as a resolute resource for all of us in this time of need even though she has been shunned by the rest of the University. She is the type of individual that the University of Virginia needs more of--not less. I have supported the University through thick and thin to promote our best interests, but I will be distraught if anything happens to Dean Eramo. She is one of the best: a great Dean, advisor, mentor, and friend. I ask that you not only keep her at this University, but that you support her through this difficult time. We are one University, and this is where we start.”

~~~

“I met Dean Eramo when she came and spoke to Orientation Leaders in the summer of 2013. She spoke at length not only about official processes and proceedings surrounding sexual assault and reporting at UVa, but she also conveyed a strong passion and deep sense of empathy when she talked about working with survivors. I didn't have much of an opinion on UVa's handling of sexual assault before that point, but after I held the strong belief that there are good people working their absolute hardest in a larger flawed system. It was obvious that day Dean Eramo pours her heart and soul into her position, and it would be a shame and disservice to this University to place a disproportionate amount of blame on her shoulders.”

~~~

“I have worked with Dean Eramo in several different capacities, and I've always been absolutely blown away by the depth of her commitment to students. She is constantly thinking of ways to provide more support to students, to make the system more effective, and to do the best job possible within the confines of the system. I don't think that UVA is perfect in the way we deal with sexual assault — far from it — but Dean Eramo shines out as one of the examples of something we're doing right. She is an advocate, support system, and friend to ALL students she interacts with, survivor or not. We all benefit from her tireless, passionate work, and that work deserves to be praised and honored rather than condemned.”

~~~

“When a friend comes to me, Dean Eramo is one of the first resources I suggest. I trust her completely.”

~~~

“Dean Eramo,
I am so grateful for your vocation to serve some of the most vulnerable members of our community. You inspire students to be and do good! We are indebted to you and your work, and UVa is a better place for your long and enduring service. Please know that your efforts are both acknowledged and deeply appreciated.”

~~~

“Dean Eramo, along with many others, has worked tirelessly to create a safe environment for survivors at this university, and we should all be grateful for her diligence.”

~~~

“Dear Eramo,
You don't know me, but I briefly met you in line at Greenberry's last year, and have heard of the wonderful and thankless things you have done for this university. Do not let those who do not know of all you do prevent you from letting your light shine to the entire community, which it has done for many years. In times of darkness, people merely try to place blame on others to enhance their own feelings. You are a rock and an inspiration to this community.”

~~~

“My experiences with Dean Eramo have been nothing but positive. Out of all the administrators and faculty I've spoken to, she is one of the most knowledgeable about sexual assault and the most passionate about stopping it on grounds. She is an asset to the UVa community and to survivors.”

~~~

“Misplaced anger and scapegoat moves get us nowhere. Let us not rush to a foolish action that punishes a valued member of our community.”

~~~

“Dean Eramo has consistently stood as a source of advice for me as I help advice other men on how to approach the topic of sexual assault.”

~~~

“I have heard nothing but great things regarding the office and work of Dean Nicole Eramo from survivors of sexual assault. This incendiary article paints standard counseling procedure in a negative light, which has given an inaccurate representation of her work to people who may not have any experience or interaction with her themselves. I am in support of Dean Nicole Eramo.”

~~~

“I have heard nothing but positive things about Dean Eramo, and I hope the administration chooses not to give in to external political pressure but actually deal with this matter like it should be dealt with.”

~~~

“Let me begin by saying that I have not had any personal experience interacting with Dean Eramo. However, I have had many friends, before and after this article release, speak highly the work she has done for them. I truly believe that she is an asset to the community and does a very difficult and often controversial job. Letting her go would only reflect administrative reaction, not action.”

~~~

“I've had the privilege of getting to know Dean Eramo primarily in her role as Chair of the Sexual Misconduct Board. One trial that I worked on lasted long days and late nights. Dean Eramo was neither the trial chair nor one of the jurors, yet she still stayed with us in Peabody all throughout the trial. She provided invaluable support to the complainant and was prepared to help the trial team in any way. I admire Dean Eramo's compassion for and dedication to her work, without ever asking for anything in return.
I also took part in Leadership 2000 (L2K), which Dean Eramo is also head of. I greatly enjoyed the week and was able to form lasting friendships. I applaud Dean Eramo for being a champion for student self-governance and opportunities for leadership at the University.”

~~~

“As the friend of a survivor, I understand Dean Eramo to be an invaluable resource both bureaucratically and emotionally to survivors, and to lose her would be to lose an irreplaceable asset to both the survivors and the broader UVA community.”

~~~

“I have had multiple encounters with Dean Eramo and have left every single one with the thought that she is not only great at her job but a great person as well.”

~~~

“In my experience with Dean Eramo, she has been compassionate and extremely competent at her job.”

~~~

“During my nearly 10 years as a colleague at the University, I have worked with Dean Eramo while I served UVA in the Women's Center, in Residence Life, Fraternity & Sorority Life, the Commerce School and as the faculty 'advisor' to One in Four. In all of these interactions, Dean Eramo has emerged as one of a small handful of colleagues (including Claire Kaplan, Pat Lampkin, and now Emily Renda) who have done the most with students to advance their collective thinking about sexual violence in our community. This article presents us as a community with a unique moment to turn the narrative toward rational progress in the areas of violence prevention, education, and advocacy. We would be nothing short of foolish to take that turn toward progress and healing without the cogent and stalwart leadership of Dean Eramo among us. I earnestly hope that we quickly dismiss political considerations such as firing good and thoughtful people, to promptly move beyond a carefully edited and sensational account penned by an external popular magazine, and focus immediately on listening to and addressing the real and unfiltered experiences of UVA students and community members. Sexual violence is not new on our Grounds, but we do have in front of us a remarkable opportunity to influence real, durable social change if we are willing to first endure an honest assessment from within. May we take the time and energy required to do so.”

~~~

“I have had the good fortune to work with Nicole in numerous capacities. She is a professional expert in the area of sexual violence prevention and response. I have learned so much from her, which has positively impacted my ability to better serve our students. The students and staff (myself included) need her guidance now more than ever. Nicole is essential to our team. I have called her at all hours of the night and during the day, and she always gave me sound advice on how to proceed. I am sincerely grateful for her compassion to students and mentorship of me.”

~~~

“I worked with Dean Nicole Eramo from 2006 to 2009 and have called her countless times since then for advice and counsel. She is a consummate colleague who never fails to respond to a request for help, especially when it comes to informing the public about sexual misconduct. Most recently, she presented to my peer group from 10 different business schools. Always professional, articulate, and engaging, she provided abundant information they found incredibly useful for the work they do at their home institutions for supporting survivors. I cannot say enough about the great work Nicole does. She is an amazing colleague whom I greatly admire and respect!”

In support and gratitude,

First Name Last Name Affiliation
William Adcock Class of 2015
Hawa Ahmed Class of 2015
Elena Alba Class of 2016
Itiya Aneece Graduate Student
Andrea Arellano Class of 2016
Donia Attia Class of 2015
Allen Au Class of 2015
Taylor Barr Class of 2017
Caroline Bartholomew Class of 2014
Sam Baughan Class of 2017
Branson Berger Class of 2016
Danielle Bernstein Class of 2017
Ebob-Tabi Besong Class of 2016
Vishwa Bhuta Class of 2015
Elizabeth Brailsoford Class of 2015
Alexandra Brenin Class of 2015
Sam Brickfield Class of 2015
Isaac Buckley Class of 2015
Shannon Bush Class of 2015
William Cadigan Class of 2015
Blakeley Calhoun Class of 2015
Pat Callaghan Class of 2016
Allison Campbell Doss Class of 2017
Yiqi Cao Class of 2015
Anne Cathriner Class of 2017
Maggie Chambers Class of 2015
Annie Clark Class of 2016
Bryan Cochran Class of 2016
Stephanie Coffua Class of 2016
Corinne Conn Class of 2015
Dillon Crawford Class of 2017
William Cray Class of 2017
Will Crimmins Class of 2016
Audrey Crooks Class of 2017
Lilly Crown Class of 2017
Joseph Dardick Class of 2015
Camille Darling Class of 2015
Raj Das Class of 2017
Staige Davis Class of 2014
Connor Davis Class of 2015
Nick Dima Class of 2015
Nikki Do Class of 2016
Matthew Dorritie Class of 2015
Anne Talbot Downey Class of 2015
Clare Driggs Class of 2016
Madeline Ducharme Class of 2015
Sarah Dunaye Class of 2015
Lizzy Dunkel Class of 2015
Alex Dunkenberger Class of 2017
Harris Dunlap Class of 2017
Caroline Eckert Class of 2015
Margaret Edwards Faculty/Staff
Harry Elkins Class of 2017
Michael Ellis Class of 2016
Gabriel Fater Class of 2017
Nick Favaloro Class of 2017
Dane Ferre Class of 2012
Libby Firer Class of 2016
Parker Fleming Class of 2015
Kaija Flood Class of 2016
Hailey Flores Class of 2015
Conor Flynn Class of 2015
Annie Forrest Class of 2015
Caelan Fortes Class of 2015
Robert Forton Class of 2015
Sidney Gafford Class of 2015
Morgan George Class of 2017
Kiera Givens Class of 2017
Ben Gorman Class of 2016
Matthew Gosnell Class of 2017
Meg Gould Class of 2015
Patrick Greco Class of 2016
Blake Griggs Class of 2015
Frances Grimball Class of 2015
Danielle Hafer Class of 2017
Connor Hankin Class of 2016
James Hardardt Class of 2015
Meghan Hardman Class of 2015
Daniel Harelson Class of 2015
Josh Harrison Class of 2017
Kirsten Harry Class of 2017
Virginia Hart Class of 2016
James Hatcher Class of 2016
Walker Hawkins Class of 2015
John Hayden Class of 2016
Ali Hazel Class of 2016
Brian Head Class of 2015
William Henagan Class of 2017
William Hewlett Class of 2017
Nicholas Hine Class of 2015
Eric Hobby Class of 2017
Megan Hogge Class of 2016
Caroline Hollis Class of 2016
Sarah Holsinger Class of 2015
McLean Hudson Class of 2017
Sam Hughes Class of 2017
Brittany Hungate Class of 2016
Thomas Hutson Class of 2015
Katy Hutto Class of 2015
Joe Hyman Class of 2017
Emily Irwin Class of 2017
Allison Ivener Class of 2016
Arden Ivens-Anderson Class of 2015
Mayura Iyer Class of 2015
Brigitte Jahncke Class of 2015
Martese Johnson Class of 2016
Win Jordan Class of 2015
Elisabeth Kayton Class of 2017
Robert Kelley Class of 2016
Robert Kelly Class of 2015
Laura Kelly Class of 2015
Jake Kenneally Class of 2014
Tiffani Kennedy Class of 2017
Colin Kent Class of 2015
John Kepley Class of 2017
Allie Kerstein Class of 2015
Rafat Khan Class of 2015
Brianna Kim Class of 2015
Timothy Kimble Class of 2015
Troy Kirwin Class of 2016
George Knaysi Class of 2015
Katie Kozlowski Class of 2017
Sara Kropp Class of 2017
Marissa Kuo Class of 2016
Nicholas Lee Class of 2015
Christy Lee Class of 2015
Philip Letsou Class of 2015
Alex Lichtenstein Class of 2015
Kyle Liggan Class of 2017
Emily Lloyd Class of 2014
Margaret Lowe Class of 2016
Conner Lynch Class of 2017
Usnish Majumdar Class of 2016
James Malnati Class of 2015
Erin Mancini Class of 2015
Joe Martin Class of 2015
Leslie Martin Class of 2016
Declan Mawer Class of 2017
Eric McDaniel Class of 2014
Paige McDermott Class of 2015
Lauren McMahon Class of 2015
Saheel Mehta Class of 2013
Sandra Menendez Class of 2015
Augustina Mensa-Kwao Class of 2015
Isabelle Merritt Class of 2016
Elizabeth Minneman Class of 2015
Marta Moore Class of 2015
Wendy Morrison Class of 2015
Claire Mueller Class of 2015
Cara Mumford Class of 2016
Cara Murphy Class of 2016
Vimal Nair Class of 2015
Alejandro Nava Moncada Class of 2016
Nikoe Navarro Class of 2015
Megan Nieto Class of 2017
Asher Noble Class of 2016
Patricia O'Donnell Class of 2017
Nathaniel Oberholtzer Class of 2017
Aaron Ojalvo Class of 2015
Helen Elizabeth Old Class of 2016
Chukwudumebi Joy Omenyi Class of 2015
John Ormiston Class of 2016
Nikhil Padmanabhan Class of 2017
Allison Palacios Class of 2016
Sanjay Palat Class of 2015
Caroline Parker Class of 2015
Reade Paterno Class of 2016
Julia Pedrick Class of 2015
Walker Peterson Class of 2017
Andy Petters Staff Member
Kylie Philbin Class of 2015
Althea Pickering Class of 2017
Melissa Picon Class of 2016
Will Pike Class of 2016
Thomas Pilnik Class of 2016
Catalina Pinto Class of 2017
Chase Pion Class of 2016
Charlie Putnam Class of 2015
Liamarie Quinde Class of 2016
Shruti Ramesh Class of 2015
Caroline Reed Class of 2015
Tommy Reid Class of 2015
Katherine Rendleman Class of 2017
Leah Retta Class of 2016
Emily Richards Class of 2015
Lindsay Riordan Class of 2017
Katherine Ripley Class of 2015
Ian Robertson Class of 2016
Evan Roderick Class of 2016
Sarah Roderick Class of 2015
Elly Roller Class of 2015
Julie Roth Class of 2016
Kayleigh Roy Class of 2015
Nayantara Roy Class of 2016
Lindsay Sackellares Class of 2015
Nicole Schneiter Class of 2016
Peter Schnuck Class of 2017
Daniel Scholz Class of 2015
Susannah Scott Class of 2015
Gemma Seidita Class of 2015
Charlotte Seiler Class of 2016
Sanjana Sekhar Class of 2017
Ashley Self Class of 2015
Emily Shelton Class of 2016
Thomas Sisson Class of 2017
Nadine Skaff Class of 2015
Steven Smathers Class of 2017
Alex Sneider Class of 2015
Katie Somers Class of 2015
Sunny Sowards Class of 2016
Walker Spier Class of 2016
Charlie Stephens Class of 2016
Hannah Strub Class of 2015
Haley Swartz CLAS BA 2015, Batten MPP 2016
Matt Taylor Class of 2016
Trip Templeman Class of 2015
Cameron Thum Class of 2016
Philip Todd Class of 2015
David Tondreau Class of 2017
Sarah Towler Class of 2017
Kate Travis Class of 2015
Alex Trevino Class of 2016
Hannah Trible Class of 2009
Charlie Tyson Class of 2014
Andrea Valdez Class of 2015
Jack Vallar Class of 2016
Kris Van Norman Class of 2016
Tierney Vial Class of 2015
Logan Walker Class of 2017
Morgan Wall Class of 2015
David Wall Class of 2015
Charles Wallace Class of 2015
Keating Walsh Class of 2016
Evelyn Wang Class of 2018
Ana Wasserman Class of 2015
Hannah Waxelbaum Class of 2017
Landon Weis Class of 2016
Kyle West Class of 2016
Margaret Whalen Class of 2016
Haley Widdowson Class of 2016
Laura Widener Class of 2016
Chris Wilcox Elliott PhD Alum '11
Sarah Wilcox Elliott A&P Faculty
Nicholas Willenbrock Class of 2016
Gordon Willis Class of 2017
Nicole Winfree Class of 2015
Daria Winsky Class of 2016
Connor Wood Class of 2015
Whitney Wu Class of 2017
Kevin Zeithaml Class of 2015
Virginia Zentmeyer Class of 2017
Lina Zimmerman Class of 2016


This letter was compiled by Sara Surface, External Chair of the Sexual Violence Prevention Coalition.


Published November 24, 2014 in Letters to the Editor, Letters







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