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Life


Life

A 'day' to remember

What do 1,400 doughnuts, 10,000 pounds of apples, 800 McDonald's hamburgers, 10 large Domino's pizzas, a thousand Wal-Mart dollars, 500 Christmas cards, hundreds of better-off children, clean communities, innumerable cans of food and thousands of Wahoo volunteers add up to?


Life

Odds and Ends

A pounding challenge Wannabe boxers from around the University gathered in the Amphitheater yesterday afternoon to work out and win prizes. HBO, ESPN The Magazine and Student Council co-sponsored the "Pound-for-Pound Challenge College Tour" which began at noon and ended with a drawing at 4 p.m. "It's a promotional event to get college students interested in boxing," said John Finley, fourth-year College student and Student Council chief financial officer. After signing a waiver, participants tried their hand at various activities from punching a smaller speed bag, a larger heavy bag, jumping with a skip rope, partaking in the Slam Man Showdown and joining a workout session. Students won prizes based on the number of activities they participated in.


Life

Odds and Ends

Ringing in the third year First years have Convocation; fourth years have graduation, but what about those who are stuck in the middle of their undergraduate experience?


Life

Professional wrestling is foundation of civilization

With professional wrestling becoming increasingly popular many people are asking the question, "Is pro wrestling a sport or some other brand of entertainment that resembles a porno movie gone horribly wrong?" Here are the basic qualifications of major sports: Men and/or women wearing tight clothes, referees making terrible calls, people getting badly injured or killed and screaming idiot fans. Going by these qualifications alone, one would assume that wrestling is a sport.


Life

Students take pride in expressions of heritage

A traditional Dabkah dance, multi-national fashion show and the tango were only a few of the cultural activities performed by students in hopes of enlightening and entertaining audience members at Culturefest '99 Saturday. A lot of heart, energy and fancy footwork went into this day devoted to representing students' individual ethnicities and learning about other cultures.


Life

Former pro tennis player teaches local students

Although it has been more than a decade since Renee Blount, a former University assistant women's tennis coach, last graced the grass courts of Wimbledon, tennis is still very much a part of her life. After a rewarding career on the Women's Professional Tennis Tour, Blount has settled down just 20 minutes east of Grounds in Fluvanna County. Without the stress of maintaining a top-100 ranking in the world, which Blount held throughout her 11-year career, she now focuses on teaching the game she loves.


Life

Hot Cakes: Don't let the name fool you

When Lisa McEwan opened her dessert business in October 1988, she didn't imagine that 11 years later, Hot Cakes would have transformed itself from a small cake company to a quaint eatery in the Barracks Road Shopping Plaza. Upon entering the store, the faint aroma of coffee and fresh baking permeated the air, hinting of good things to come.


Life

Odds and Ends

Comp competition If the idea of spending Parents Weekend wandering around Grounds with your family admiring the Rotunda for the millionth time holds little allure, the University's chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery is providing a novel alternative. The organization is hosting its second annual Programming Contest in Olsson Hall tomorrow.


Life

Watering football down to the basics

His friends call him "Bobby Boucher." Rich Abadie, the University's head football equipment manager who hails from Louisiana, manages a dozen Wahoo "waterboys." But don't call them that to their face.


Life

Former astronaut lands on solid Grounds

Not everyone gets to experience it: The adrenaline rush of your life as you approach a speed of 17,500 miles per hour, ending with the feeling that you weigh eight times your normal weight and can't even stand unless your eyes are open. This is one feeling a University professor experienced first-hand. "I wouldn't have missed a minute of it," said Kathy Thornton, professor of technology, culture and communication, and mechanical, aerospace and nuclear engineering.


Life

Odds and Ends

Touchdown! Any Wahoos still crying over the loss to Virginia Tech finally can find comfort by watching an upcoming episode of public television's "Living In Virginia," which will examine the history of the rivalry between Virginia Tech and the University. The program will explore the 100-year-old football rivalry, highlighting colossal comebacks and legendary players. The documentary, created by WVPT -- PBS for the Shenandoah Valley and Charlottesville -- begins with the first game played between Virginia Tech and the University in 1895.


Life

Odds and Ends

Cash cut-off Some professors might be finding advising less materially profitable this year. According to an Inside UVA Online press release, College Dean Melvyn P.