Chris Wilson


Articles

Reforming the system

The following four-part series chronicles the experiences of former University student Kathryn Russell, who, after accusing a fellow student of sexual assault in February of 2004, brought charges up with the University Sexual Assault Board.

Inside the hearing

The following four-part series chronicles the experiences of former University student Kathryn Russell, who, after accusing a fellow student of sexual assault in February of 2004, brought charges up with the University Sexual Assault Board.

Prosecuting the case

The following four-part series chronicles the experiences of former University student Kathryn Russell, who, after accusing a fellow student of sexual assault in February of 2004, brought charges up with the University Sexual Assault Board.

Pursuing charges of rape

The following four-part series chronicles the experiences of former University student Kathryn Russell, who, after accusing a fellow student of sexual assault in February of 2004, brought charges up with the University Sexual Assault Board.

Understanding Turner

Leaning against the wall in M. Rick Turner's second-floor office in the Luther P. Jackson House, home of the Office of African-American Affairs, is a chalkboard on which Turner has written the following quote: "The most meaningful and useful function of African-American administrators on white campuses is to become advocates for African-American students." Now in his 17th year as dean of African-American Affairs, Turner has built a legacy doing just that: acting as a vocal advocate for African-American students at the University. The quote, from civil rights advocate Dr. Samuel DeWitt Proctor, is a constant reminder of his role, Turner said. "It has told me and taught me that I am here for a specific purpose," he said, "that I've been sent here to do this." But Turner undoubtedly is a controversial figure on Grounds, and he is the first to admit it.

Behind the lines

OBSCURITY is a cruel mistress, but that is the fate to which every college newspaper editor is quickly assigned when his or her time has expired.

Policy may afford Sofka future hearing

A week after details of the recent dismissal of Politics Prof. James R. Sofka from his post as director of the Echols program became public, there remains some question about whether Sofka was denied established procedures according to University policy. A Jan.

The Big Move

Things change, obviously. And though it might seem as though moving into college is one of the few experiences which unites students across the generations, even this most momentous of days has evolved over time.For starters, Pat Lampkin, University vice president for student affairs, said the University has taken great strides in recent years to facilitate the acclimatization of new students to the University. "Resident staff is absolutely focused on their adjustment," Lampkin said, citing summer orientation programs as one valuable tool which allows new students to get an early look at the Grounds. Additionally, student greeters, typically in brazen neon T-shirts to distinguish themselves in a crowd, are on site at the dormitories to answer questions and make new students feel welcome. The Move: then and now One salient difference between the current generation of college-goers and their parents' generation is the experiences they bring to campuses. "This generation is more traveled," Lampkin said.