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U.Va. selects 114 Lefevre residents for prevalence testing after wastewater indicates possible COVID-19 infection

There are currently no known positive cases in the residence hall

The University is monitoring wastewater from residence halls, which can detect the presence of COVID-19.
The University is monitoring wastewater from residence halls, which can detect the presence of COVID-19.

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UPDATE (Sept. 20, 1:45 p.m.): Three cases of COVID-19 were identified within Lefevre, the University announced Sunday. There were previously no known cases prior to Friday's testing. 


The University instructed 114 residents of the Lefevre residence hall to partake in asymptomatic prevalence testing at the Student Activities Building on Friday in an email sent to Lefevre residents Thursday evening. 

There are currently no known positive cases of COVID-19 in the dormitories, but wastewater testing indicated possible infection, University Spokesperson Brian Coy confirmed.

Earlier this month, the University announced that it was expanding population testing procedures to include mandatory asymptomatic testing and rapid saliva screening.

The University is monitoring wastewater from residence halls, which can detect the presence of COVID-19. If the wastewater indicates a breakout, the University plans to test all residents of the building.

As part of its effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19 through asymptomatic individuals, the University plans to notify anywhere from 50 to 150 students daily that they are required to provide samples. The testing takes place in the Student Activities Building and is mandatory for students living and learning on Grounds and in the Charlottesville-Albemarle area.

“As part of that program, you can expect us to continue to contact residents of dorms across Grounds to ask them to take tests, either onsite or at the Student Activities Building,” Coy said.

On Wednesday, positive resident cases and wastewater indicators in Balz-Dobie dormitories led the University to test all 188 residents onsite. Testing revealed 10 additional cases in the dorm — bringing the total to 15 — according to an email sent to residents by Provost Liz Magill, Chief Medical Advisor Mitchell Rosner and Medicine and Pathology Prof. Amy Mathers.

The University’s COVID Tracker reported Thursday a total of 430 positive coronavirus cases in the community since Aug. 17 — of which 382 are student cases — marking a new highest daily increase of 52 positive cases due to a testing backlog.

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