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News

City fights to keep local homeowners

(This is the first in a three part series about Charlottesville's efforts to attract middle-income residents.) Charlottesville officials are worried that too many single-family homes are being converted into rental units for students, driving away middle-income residents who are a valuable asset to the city. The past 10 years have shown a slight decline in owner-occupied homes in Charlottesville -- this despite an overall increase in the total housing units. In an effort to keep its permanent residents, City Council has been trying to improve residential parking near the University and give residents other incentives to stay in the city. The problem begins as single family homes in areas near Grounds get bought up quickly by landlords, who convert them into rental property for students, Charlottesville Vice Mayor Meredith Richards said. "We have lost a lot of home ownership," Richards said. Landlords who rent apartments to students can pay more than market value for available homes -- more than middle-income residents can pay.


News

Thieves steal 6,000 newspapers at U. Missouri

The staff of the University of Missouri's student newspaper, The Maneater, were dismayed to discover last Tuesday morning that several thousand copies of their paper had been stolen. Staff members discovered that the papers were missing upon arriving at The Maneater's central office in Brady Commons, which is the paper's main distribution center. Paul Wilson, editor-in-chief of The Maneater, said the papers were taken from the office sometime early last Tuesday morning. Students noticed other papers, distributed at various sites around campus, were missing also. "I believe that the others were taken sometime during the weekend," Wilson said.


News

Faculty address teaching, research at Friday retreat

The Faculty Senate met Friday to discuss the role of research and teaching and their effects on students and faculty at the University. The retreat was a springing point for this year's Senate agenda, which will look into the role of research and teaching at the University.


News

Honor keeps grievance panel in 7-7-1 vote

Honor Committee Chairman Hunter Ferguson broke a tie vote and decided to retain pre-trial grievance panels after the Committee voted 7-7-1 on the issue in its meeting last night. Students are able to appeal cases to a grievance panel after being accused of an honor offense but before going to trial. Ferguson decided against eliminating the panel because the Committee has not fully discussed its merits, he said. Several Committee members expressed concern about the panel because the current bylaws concerning the panel allow the Executive Committee to appoint itself as a grievance panel and dismiss a case.


News

Proposed Board plan raises racial concerns

In response to growing criticism over the legality of using race as a factor in admissions, the Office of Admissions and the Provost's Office have drawn up a proposal for a summer program to help recruit students from diverse backgrounds. The program, which will target underprivileged and minority middle and high school students, will be a two-week session at the University where students are exposed to various academic and social aspects of the University, Dean of Admissions John A.


News

Rue encourages involvement in Hereford residential life

Situated on the University's outer fringes, Hereford College has established a reputation as a community unto itself, which was affirmed at last night's convocation for Hereford College students at Runk dining hall. The eight-year old residential college provides programming for residents to give the college a sense of community. "The horizons of Hereford are only beginning to be articulated," Hereford College Principal Daniel Bluestone said. The convocation ceremony included the induction of Hereford fellows, who are deans and professors responsible for "organizing programs that resonate with the people who are living here," Bluestone said. Among the inductees was Dean of Students Penny Rue, who was hired in the spring to replace former Dean of Students Robert T.


News

Group plans to finalize cultural board structure

A group of students and administrators are finalizing their plans to implement a cultural programming board, which has been allocated more than $30,000 to bring diverse programs to the University. The board will be composed of students and administrators, and will report to William W.


News

Faculty disagree with web notes

Several Web sites now are offering University students money for posting their course notes on the Internet, a practice University and Honor Committee officials say may challenge the University's ideals of intellectual integrity. Two such sites, www.studentu.com and www.allstudents.com, offer students up to $300 and $400 per semester, respectively.


News

Students battle language lab lines

The University's newly renovated digital foreign language lab faced growing pains this week as students flooded the center with their first week's assignments. Students were forced to sign up on waitlists and wait up to 20 minutes for a vacant lab computer. The lab was crowded because hours were cut back to accommodate student and faculty training. "Instructors were scheduled to bring in classes as a whole for training," said David T.


News

Bloomfield energizes physics

Are you interested in why balls bounce and planes fly? Many students graduate from the University knowing the answers to these and other questions, all about "How Things Work." Physics Prof.


News

Couric criticizes Gilmore policies

State Sen. Emily Couric, D-Charlottesville, Del. Mitch Van Yahres, D-Charlottesville, and House of Delegates candidate Ed Wayland (D) held a press conference on the steps of the Rotunda yesterday, lambasting Virginia Gov.


News

University follows stadium plan

Despite recent complaints by Jefferson Park neighborhood residents over the appearance of elements of the Scott Stadium expansion, Board of Visitors members and University administrators said it is unlikely that the Board will initiate any major project facelift. "I don't foresee any action on this item" at the Board's October meeting, University Rector John P.


News

Honor questions pre-trial procedures

Continuing review of the Honor Committee's bylaws has prompted Committee members to question how an honor case should be handled in between the Investigative Panel and the trial stages. Recent discussion has centered on the possibility that a biased Executive Committee could abuse their power by unjustly dismissing a case. "Some cases may be fundamentally unfair to the accused student, and there is the need for a mechanism to dismiss them," Graduate Arts and Sciences Rep.


News

Administrators call for more diverse faculty

(This is the first in a two-part weekly series on faculty diversity) Although a recent study shows that universities and colleges have hired more women and minority faculty members in the last seven years than ever before, University officials say all its departments will have to step up efforts in recruiting or the door of equal opportunity may slide shut. According to an American Association of State Colleges and Universities newsletter, the report, published by the National Center for Education Statistics, shows that faculty who have seven years or less experience tend to be more diverse than faculty with more experience and tenure.


News

Sigourney Weaver to attend film fest

Entitled "TechnoVisions," this year's Virginia Film Festival hopes to draw a large audience by featuring big-name actress Sigourney Weaver and Stan Winston, a University alumnus and special effects guru. In contrast to last year's "Cool" theme, the technological aspects of this year's Festival will be "more of a visceral experience" for filmgoers, said Richard Herskowitz, festival director and drama professor. "We're having many more rides and virtual reality experiences ... We're emphasizing movies as thrill rides.


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Sept. 9, 1999 represents first in Y2K problems

If the world hasn't ended when you read this article, then the first hurdle of Y2K has been passed and the lesser-known cousin of Y2K, the September 9, 1999 Problem, has been bypassed. The Y2K problem stems from the fact that in a memory-precious era of computing, only the last two digits of a year are encoded.


News

Candidates discuss political platforms

The election season is coming on full force at the University, where last night students had an opportunity to hear both Democratic and Republican candidates for state and local offices pitch their platforms. The candidates, who, coincidentally, were invited by the University Democrats and College Republicans on the same night in Cabell Hall, went on to discuss the issues that most concerned them, including education and health care. Ed Wayland, a Democratic candidate for the state House of Delegates, spoke first at a meeting of University Democrats, where he stressed that this election cycle is crucial, since the majority in the Virginia General Assembly is up for grabs.