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Scrapbooks shed light on Jefferson

The recent discovery of Thomas Jefferson's personal scrapbooks at Alderman Library reveals the sentimental side of his complex personality. The four-volume scrapbook -- composed of clippings pasted to hand-made envelopes -- includes political items, scientific information and even romantic poetry.


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DNA fingerprinting gives strong evidence in cases

Police are hoping that DNA fingerprinting will help bring them one step closer to identifying a suspect in the Venable area rape case that shook the University community last month. DNA evidence from the crime scene is being compared to DNA profiles from all of the databanks in the United States.


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Atkins diet prompts health concerns

The '80s were the beginning of the big fitness craze in America. Around the time of the fitness boom came Dr. Robert Atkins, a cardiologist who graduated from Cornell Medical School.


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High school student arrested for vandalism

Shortly before Monticello High School students were dismissed Tuesday afternoon, Albemarle County Police arrested a student who confessed to vandalizing the school with racist graffiti. The 17-year-old student, a white male, is a senior who attends the high school.


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Urinary study shows depression connection

Babies aren't the only ones - 30 million American adults wear diapers. But it's no laughing matter. Incontinence affects one out of three Americans over the age of 60 and costs $17 billion every year to treat. Researchers in the University Medical Center's Urology Department are working to understand the probable causes and treatments of the disorder. Properly defined, urinary incontinence is the uncontrollable urine loss of a sufficient magnitude to comprise a hygienic problem for the sufferer. Dr. William Steers, chairman of the Urology Department, co-authored the results of a new study published this summer, which says that low levels of serotonin, a brain chemical, may be the reason behind this often embarrassing and restricting problem. Urinary incontinence exists in three forms, categorized by their causes: stress incontinence, which is attributed to obesity and physical exertion; urge incontinence, which is characterized by an overactive bladder; and mixed stress/urge, which has symptoms of both types.


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Casteen addresses admissions

In an open letter to the University community released last night, University President John T. Casteen III emphasized the necessity of maintaining equal opportunity in admissions. The letter, which was released to The Cavalier Daily, details from a historical perspective Casteen's analysis of considering race as a factor in admissions. "Alongside other Virginia colleges and universities, we have worked over the years to remedy the brutal and specific costs ... of Virginia's history of racial segregation," Casteen said in the letter. Although the University "operates within the rule of law," he said, one of the problems is that "no one is confident now what the law is." Casteen, who was formerly the University's dean of admissions, said race is not the definitive criterion when admitting students and noted that SAT scores or grade-point-averages are not the only measures of success. Earlier this month, University Board of Visitors member Terence P.


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Neurology receives $5.7 million of federal grant

University doctors and researchers may soon understand more about the causes of Parkinson's Disease, thanks to a $5.7 million federal grant awarded to the University Health System yesterday. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a division of the National Institute of Health, awarded a total of $49 million in federal funding to eight schools for Parkinson's research. The Health System will use its five-year grant to further investigate abnormalities in cell mitochondria, an area in which it already has conducted extensive research. "Working out the specifics of the mitochondrial genetic abnormalities and the mechanisms of how cells die [or survive] that contain the abnormal mitochondrial genes is the scientific thrust of our research program," said Dr. James P.


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Gore discusses life, campaign with students

Gore, the wife of Al Gore - vice president and democratic presidential candidate - said her husband "is the guy who's perfect to be the next president." Gore met with about 10 students at the Corner's Espresso Royale coffeehouse, drank a hot café mocha and fielded questions about campaigning, affirmative action and the 2000 presidential election. Responding to a question about the recent debate surrounding the use of race as a factor in the University's admissions process, she said she did not know all of the details but said she and her husband strongly support affirmative action. She added that while she is campaigning, her husband's bid for the presidency is her main focus, but that her family must always find a balance between campaigning and family life. "The pressures are enormous," Gore said.


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Litigation influences admissions

Recent scrutiny over the use of racial factors in the University's admissions process reflects a larger national phenomenon -- the trend to adjust current affirmative action policies to dodge lawsuits, say university administrators across the nation. The effect has been an adverse one, with the intellectual environment challenged and minority enrollment even dropping at some schools, said officials at several of the University's peer institutions in interviews with The Cavalier Daily. These universities include James Madison University, the University of Michigan, the University of Texas-Austin, the University of California-Berkeley and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Despite the legacy of 1978's historic Supreme Court decision, The Regents of the University of California v.


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Pundits discuss Goode's affiliation

A Republican takeover of the General Assembly in this fall's elections may put pressure on U.S. Congressman Virgil Goode (D-5th) to switch political parties. Goode's conservative voting record often has set him against his party's position.


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Police investigate Phi

Charlottesville Police and University officials are investigating a Sept. 16 allegation of illegal hazing of second-year Engineering student John W.


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University of Richmond football player drowns

University of Richmond freshman Donnie Lindsey Jr. of Annandale, Va., drowned after jumping into Westhampton Lake in the middle of campus with other freshmen Sunday night. Lindsey, a Richmond Spiders football player, and other students were walking back from an induction ceremony called Freshman Investiture.


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College Board launches for-profit Web site

The non-profit College Board, administrator of the Scholastic Aptitude Test, is tackling its first for-profit subsidiary ever--creating a commercial Web site in an effort to stay competitive with the growing multitude of online commercial SAT-prep courses.


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County school vandalized by racist graffiti

"Monticello Loves to Hate" was among the racist and threatening statements spray-painted on the large sidewalk in front of Monticello High School's central entrance early yesterday morning. According to Albemarle County Police Sgt.


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Charlottesville seeks relief from traffic woes to attract residents

(This is the third in a three-part series about Charlottesville's efforts to attract middle-income residents.) Charlottesville is no stranger to parking and transportation woes, and city officials are worried that these problems are hurting city residents' quality of life. The city aims to improve public transportation and create a more pedestrian-friendly environment to attract middle-income residents.