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Does anyone know the bottom line on Y2K?

My friends often ask me questions they feel I can deal with, since I'm a computer science major and thus, a "techno-geek". The questions range from what kind of computer to buy to the more esoteric ones where they try to stump a computer science major. But recently, the most popular questions have been about Y2K. "On the eve of the new millennium should I avoid flying?


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Direct student loans save federal funding

U.S. Department of Education officials told Congress Tuesday that the five-year-old direct-student-loan program will save the government more money than the federally guaranteed loan program. "Department of Education analyses indicate that overall per-loan Federal costs for the William D.


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Council takes first steps for new student activities offices

A plan for a new student activities center is in its initial stages, after several members of Student Council met yesterday to discuss the logistics of the installation of such a facility at the University. The need for a new student activities center was first proposed by last year's Executive Committee under the direction of former Council President Howard A.


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Center to sponsor democracy talks

Several of the nation's leading political figures will meet Monday in the Rotunda for American Democracy Conference '99, addressing "the health of democracy" in the United States today.


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Casteen taps faculty for Harrison Awards

In a yearly attempt to promote excellence in teaching, the University bestowed its annual Harrison Teaching Awards on eight outstanding faculty members. The awards first were given out three years ago to reward exceptional professors who demonstrate dedication, creativity and leadership in their classroom endeavors. Members of the Provost's Promotion and Tenure Committee, department chairmen and students were eligible to nominate award recipients.


News

University offers option for degree in speech pathology

Local speech pathologists that need to fulfill a recently enforced master's degree requirement now can apply to the University if they want to work at state public schools. Carol Dudding, part-time program coordinator for the Communication Disorders Program, said the Virginia Department of Education is enforcing a requirement that all public school speech pathologists must have a graduate degree by 2005 or they will lose their jobs. "The Virginia Department of Education requires that all speech pathologists working in the schools have a master's degree or were grandfathered in," meaning that they received sufficient training and education equivalent to the master's instruction, Dudding said. "Five percent of speech pathologists currently have a bachelor's degree and a provisional license from the Board of Education - those are the people who need a master's by 2005," she said.


News

Revolution in the air

If you've ever questioned the worth of scientific research, its utility to mankind, and the justification for spending vast amounts of the government's money on something that just may result in nothing - sometimes you might have a case.


News

Burress' supporters rally for free speech

Protesters raised signs and chanted slogans on the Lawn yesterday as about 60 students, faculty members and University employees gathered to rally in support of Richelle Burress and the $8 Living Wage Campaign. Last week, Burress, a hospital cafeteria cashier, was sent home after refusing to remove a button supporting the $8 living wage.


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Public colleges see high income levels

A recent study shows that wealthy students increasingly are choosing to attend public universities, despite being able to afford the higher cost of private colleges and universities. The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities reached this conclusion after analyzing data from the U.S.


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Winter's reduced light leaves people feeling SAD

Every year the holiday season brings many Americans tidings of sorrow and loneliness rather than peace and good cheer. About 20 percent of Americans suffer from some sort of increased depression during the wintertime, and 5 percent of Americans endure symptoms of severe depression during the winter months, Asst.


News

U-Guides introduce tour about women, minorities

The University Guide Service is introducing a new tour focusing on the history of women and minorities in an effort to integrate more inclusive history into its tours. Still in its preliminary stages, the new tour was given to a few small groups of students, administrators, faculty and staff members yesterday. Tour organizers said they have not decided when the tours will be given in the future, but are planning on making them available regularly starting next semester. Peter Yu, assistant dean in the Office of African-American Affairs, attended one of the tours and applauded the Guide Service's initiative. "It's a good alternative for minority students to learn about their past presence at the University," Yu said. All students could benefit from this information, he said. "It's a good and natural learning experience," he added. Asst.


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Charlottesville and Albemarle County officials continue to negotiate problems in their fire services contract as the December deadline for renewal approaches.


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University officials question state faculty salary goals even after funding increase

A 6.5 percent increase in state funding for faculty salaries went into effect Thanksgiving Day, but questions remain over whether this boost will be enough to keep the University on top of its competitors. The increase is the final step in a state plan to bring the average faculty salary up to the 60th percentile of the average salary among its peer group institutions, which include Boston University, Duke University and the University of California at Berkeley, among others (see box). Members of the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, who proposed the 60th percentile benchmark in the late 1980s, created the peer institution list. But University and state officials disagree over whether the 60th percentile truly is the best target for which to aim. "I don't think the 60th percentile is an adequate goal.


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Burress reinstated, can wear $8 button

James English, senior director of Nutrition Services at the University Health System, announced yesterday that Hospital cafeteria employee Richelle Burress will be reinstated and that she would be allowed to wear her $8 pin to work. Burress was asked to leave her job last Wednesday because she refused to remove a pin that supported the living wage campaign, a campaign to raise the minimum wage of all University and contracted employees.

Latest Podcast

Today, we sit down with both the president and treasurer of the Virginia women's club basketball team to discuss everything from making free throws to recent increased viewership in women's basketball.