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City considers ending drive for town status

The city of Charlottesville is considering ending its five-year campaign to revert to town status. Charlottesville Mayor Virginia Daugherty announced last week that City Council would consider a resolution to reject the transformation of Charlottesville from an independent city to the largest town in Albemarle County. Daugherty, Vice Mayor Meredith Richards and Councilman David J.


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City, University address issues

University, Charlottesville and Albemarle County officials assembled yesterday at the Planning and Coordination Council meeting to continue a dialogue on issues facing the Charlottesville area.


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Student groups raise money to aid Indian cyclone victims

In response to the devastation caused by the Oct. 29 super cyclone that hit India, two student cultural groups are organizing students to help provide relief for the survivors of the tragedy. The Society for the Promotion of Indian Classical Music and Culture Amongst Youth and the Hindu Students Council are working with the Center for South Asian Studies to raise funds to send to the devastated area. Relief agencies estimate the death toll to be in the tens of thousands but an official death toll has not yet been released. With such a high level of destruction, students involved said they believe supplying the survivors with funds is essential. SPICMACAY Chief Coordinator Sunny Takkallapalli encouraged students to "take a moment and think of what it would be like to have nothing left, no family and no belongings." SPICMACAY is working closely with the Orissa Forum, a humanitarian relief organization, to ensure the money collected from students goes straight to the victims and does not pass through many hands, Takkallapalli said. "There is a worldwide effort to collect money to send to the victims in India.


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Garden Room faces financial difficulties

The Garden Room is facing continued financial difficulties despite recent efforts to improve its visibility on Grounds, Dining Services Director Edward Gutauskas said. Representatives from ARAmark Dining Services and the University community are meeting today to discuss the status of the Garden Room, a dining facility designed to encourage student and faculty interaction. At the meeting, "we are going to look at the service being provided and the costs incurred for the service," Gutauskas said.


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Democrats prepare for next Assembly session

Virginia's Democratic Party is facing an unprecedented situation as it begins to contend with a Republican majority in the General Assembly for the first time since Reconstruction. "It's going to be a new experience obviously," Del.


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Looking forward

Albemarle County and Greene County are adjacent and usually friendly neighbors. But when Albemarle decided to declare a bordering area by Greene County a historical preservation zone - prohibiting any development to take place in the area - and Greene County subsequently decided to build a shopping mall across the border to revive its stagnant economy, some problems ensued. This is one of the problems that the Architecture School's Institute for Sustainable Design wants to help resolve. ISD was founded in 1996, a project that Architecture Dean William McDonough supported. "He was already a well-established and nationally recognized architect with emphasis on environmental design," ISD Director Diane Dale said. Not a firm The ISD offices are located in the basement of Madison House on Rugby Road, across from the Architecture School.


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Gregory calls for improved Latino recruiting at forum

Asst. Dean of Admissions Valerie Gregory spoke at the Latino Issues Colloquium yesterday in an effort to help foster better dialogue and improve recruitment efforts between the Office of Admissions and Hispanic and Latino students. "A lot of people seem to want to focus on African-American recruitment," Gregory said.


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Longer library hours gain Council support

Every night at 1:30 a.m., Student Council College Rep. Joe Bilby counts the number of students using Clemons Library. Bilby said an average of 166 students study at that time - one fact that lead Council last night to an almost unanimous vote to pass a resolution that calls for 24-hour library services during the week. Bilby sponsored the resolution after three months of meeting with library officials and other administrators. Council's resolution serves only as a recommendation to the University administration. Bilby said the number of students studying late at night "demonstrates pretty clearly that there is a need for late-night study." Clemons Library Director James Self attended the Council meeting to address any concerns raised by the representatives. Self said the project will cost about an additional $52,000 a year, in addition to a start-up cost of $15,000. He said the library had factored the added costs into its budget request for the year, but the funding was denied. "We would be happy to do this if the University would come up with the $52,000 a year it would take to run it," he added. The library budget is approved by the Provost's Office. Self said the library now faces the choice of having to divert funds from other initiatives, such as the purchase of books and resources, to have the funds to keep the library open from Sunday morning through midnight Friday. Dean of Students Penny Rue said she is supportive of the idea, but that funding will prove problematic. "Most people don't want to fund [extended hours] at the expense of books," Rue said. According to last year's statistics compiled by the University, an average of about 123 students studied at Clemons at 4:30 a.m.


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Students incur only minor penalties for alcohol offenses

On any weekend night, within a stone's throw of the Rotunda, one can observe underage drinkers, partygoers walking with open containers of alcohol and underage students using fake IDs to obtain alcohol. Few of these students expect to end up in jail -- and almost none do, say officials familiar with students' interaction with the legal system. Students are probably over represented among those arrested locally for minor alcohol offenses such as holding an open container of alcohol in public, using a fake ID or possessing alcohol underage, Commonwealth's Attorney David Chapman said. There were only 17 arrests on Grounds for alcohol offenses during the '97-'98 school year, University Police Capt.


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Streakers face undefined consequences

The tradition of running nude through the Academical Village is a lot more complicated than choosing when to disrobe, especially when it enters the legal realm. Ever since streaking the Lawn became a popular phenomenon in the 1970s, no distinct penalty has been drawn up to punish those students who choose to bare all. University Police do not keep records of citations and arrests for streaking, but University Police Capt.

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