The Cavalier Daily
Serving the University Community Since 1890

Days on the Lawn begins March 21

About 800 students volunteer with program every year

<p>The schedule for a typical day includes a morning welcome address, opportunities to learn about and interact with different school and upper divisional school programs, a parents panel, student social, walking tours of Grounds and residence halls, a resource fair, arts reception and an active learning classroom visit.</p>

The schedule for a typical day includes a morning welcome address, opportunities to learn about and interact with different school and upper divisional school programs, a parents panel, student social, walking tours of Grounds and residence halls, a resource fair, arts reception and an active learning classroom visit.

Days on the Lawn, an annual admitted students open house, begins March 21 this year. The University Office of Undergraduate Admissions began the program 25 years ago.

Over time, the program has expanded to offer more days to visit as the incoming first year class grows. This year there are seven available dates: March 21, March 28, and April 4, 8, 11, 15 and 18.

Each day there are about 500 students in attendance and 1,000 visitors total, Assistant Dean Meagan Kraus said.

The schedule for a typical day includes a morning welcome address, opportunities to learn about and interact with different school and upper divisional school programs, a parents panel, student social, walking tours of Grounds and residence halls, a resource fair, arts reception and an active learning classroom visit.

“It’s a great way for our admitted students to interact with current students, faculty, see a dorm room, eat in the dining hall and really get a feel for life as a student on Grounds,” Kraus said.

Every year about 800 students volunteer to help with Days on the Lawn. This year’s student co-chairs are fourth-year College students Jasmine Lee and Jordan Matthews.

“Days on the Lawn was a large part of why I chose U.Va,” Lee said in an email statement. “I made my decision after attending so I know the importance that [Days on the Lawn] can have on a high school senior who is unsure of where to go to college.”

Lee said the level of student involvement and hosting admitted students during the school week makes the University unique and speaks to the excitement volunteers feel welcoming new students.

“It’s pretty unique that we have our admitted students days during the school week, but the high number of volunteers we have says a lot about the excitement to welcome new students,” Lee said. “Like me, many of our volunteers say the reason they continue to volunteer with [Days on the Lawn] is because it was so special to them as high school students.”

Volunteers do not have formal training, Lee said, but they do go through a mini-training session when they check in for their shift. Team leaders also provide information for their specific program via email beforehand.

“At our info sessions the team leaders go over various types of questions we have experienced in the past that may catch a new volunteer off guard,” Lee said. “This is just to give ideas on how to answer a question, but the main goal is to speak honestly about your experience.”

Opportunities to volunteer are still available for the six remaining Days on the Lawn.

Comments