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Life


Life

Odds and Ends

Two decades of dance In 1980, the amphitheater was in a state of complete disrepair. It had been 30 years since anyone used it.


Life

Travelling down an open road

(This is the sixth and last in a weekly series of articles on road trips within reasonable reach of the University.) I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I - I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. -Robert Frost, "The Road Not Taken" Charlottesville is much more than Emmet Street, more than the Lawn, more than Harris Teeter and more than the Mad Bowl.


Life

Odds and Ends

A new Out Look This week marks yet another milestone for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community at the University.


Life

Community confronts issue of sexual assault

After a University student reported a sexual assault April 15, the University community once again felt the tight clamp of an elusive and frightening force that affects both women and men. While this well-publicized incident renewed fear of sexual assault in the University community, most students do not realize the greatest danger lies in acquaintance rape. "The majority of sexual assaults are placed within the context of the relationship or an acquaintance," said Aretha Donnelly, Adult Education and Special Projects Coordinator at the Sexual Assault Resource Agency.


Life

Odds and Ends

Remembering crimes against humanity Last night's special screening of the film "Forty Days of Musa Dagh," in Newcomb Theater set a pensive tone at the first annual Virginia Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide. Earlier this year, the Virginia General Assembly officially proclaimed April 24th as the Day of Remembrance for the genocide that occurred in 1915 at the hands of the Turkish government. Turks and Armenians lived in relative peace for centuries until the Ottoman Empire began to collapse.


Life

Not gonna fly

"Stand up against the man!" second-year College student Andrew Starner yelled at a random student walking down the sidewalk from Monroe Hall. As he ran after the student, Starner nearly tripped over the full-size American flag he had draped over his body. The student shot back a look of bewilderment and walked more briskly in the direction of Alderman Library. "This is the weirdest thing I've ever seen since coming to college," said onlooker Hillary Bourne, a second-year College student. Alongside Starner were 10 other American Studies majors from Prof.


Life

Odds and Ends

Joining the force Tonight the Amphitheather will be filled with memories, hope and light during the Fighting Overcoming and Responding to Cancer Everywhere candlelight vigil. The evening will begin with a Glee Club performance and a speech by Bill Darrach from the University Cancer Center.


Life

A broader spectrum

After two years at the University, I finally have found my favorite house on Rugby Road. A place where everyone is welcome, and it is not who you know or how you look at the door that matters. For once, façade is irrelevant and the sole focus lies on the musical performers who take center stage.


Life

Odds and Ends

Belly dancing It may be the week of Easter and Passover, but Sunday from 4 to 9 p.m. in the Newcomb Hall Ballroom, the "Layaleena" festival promises to diverge from Matzah and Easter eggs. The second annual "Layaleena," co-sponsored by the Arab, Muslim and Persian student organizations, is intended to be a celebration of Arab culture.


Life

New chapter unfolds

Long gone are the days when fraternity brothers would joke about having All-You-Can-Eat mixers with Alpha Phi. The re-colonized University Alpha Phi branch officially moved from being a colony to a chapter again Sunday, joining the sorority's other 146 chapters throughout the United States and Canada. Three years ago, Alpha Phi's unflattering reputation began to take its toll on their recruitment efforts as the University chapter experienced a steep decline in the number of women accepting rush bids.


Life

Wading through rough waters

For the past 40 years, Arnaldo and Gloria Rodriguez, owners of the Arlington, Va., Cuban restaurant "La Cantanita," have seen their family and friends leave Cuba and Fidel Castro's regime. One of Arnaldo's employees ran through a minefield at age 17 to escape. "The boy in front of him had his leg blown off," he said. Arnaldo and Gloria are two of many Cuban Americans who think Elián Gonzalez, the six-year-old Cuban boy thrown into a politically-charged custody battle between the United States and Cuba, belongs in the U.S. "I'm the first one to say that a father should be with his son.


Life

Odds and Ends

RE: Acceptance High school seniors no longer have reason to run obsessively out to the mailbox, hoping for notification letters from their prospective colleges.


Life

Exam 'Wasteland' proves

With less than a month left in the semester, papers demand to be written, projects call out to be completed and exams loom on the horizon.


Life

Small towns: short on size, but big on charm

(This is the fifth in a weekly series of articles on road trips within reasonable reach of the University.) Back when he still was the Cougar, rocker John Mellencamp belted out odes to small-town America, and he did it well.


Life

Odds and Ends

Lights out College students nationwide are notorious for keeping night-owl hours, and students at the University are no exception.


Life

Hippies, socialists descend on D.C. for IMF protests

WASHINGTON-They hastily piled rusty wheelbarrows, planks of plywood and anything else they could find to block the intersection between D.C.'s New York Avenue and 14th Street Sunday, tying the makeshift barricade together with thin pieces of twine. Some pounded on five-gallon oil drums while women, scantily clad with faces painted brightly, chanted various anti-International Monetary Fund slogans. With all the coffee shops and clothing stores on the street shut down early, the heart of downtown D.C., it seemed, was under cardiac arrest. A woman, clad in a pair of dirty white overalls, the front emblazoned with the blood-red, roughly painted slogan "No IMF," flicked off the incessantly humming helicopter overhead; two other women, topless, covered their nipples with anti-IMF stickers and stared at the helicopter ponderously. The protests in Washington D.C.