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Life


Life

Odds and Ends

On my honor, I will pay for airport parking Anyone who says the University's honor code is not alive and well has just been proven wrong. What follows is a letter from Bryan Elliott, general manager of the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport, to Director of University Relations Louise Dudley: "Over this past weekend, a U.Va.


Life

Odds and Ends

Attention, Tom Cruise Wannabes For all those "Cocktail" fans out there who have marveled at Brian Flannigan's acrobatic mixing skills behind the bar, now comes a golden opportunity. University Union has released its Short Courses booklet, which offers students the opportunity to study everything from salsa dancing to wine tasting to kickboxing to, of course, bartending. But not so fast, Top Gun: those interested in bartending or wine tasting must present two forms of identification to prove they are of legal age. "I think [they] are beneficial because it gives students something to do other than work all the time," Short Course Chair Krista Mathis said. Costs for the courses run from $15 for a Filipino language class to $85 for introductory or advanced photography.


Life

Odds and Ends

Is that your final answer? A former University student and Cavalier Daily alumnus answered this and other money-making questions Sunday night on ABC's popular "Who Wants to be a Millionaire?" show, bringing home $2,000. "It was a lot of fun ... just to get on," 1995 graduate Matt Phillips said.


Life

Marcus examines architectural psychology of embassies

As a young boy, Jeffrey Marcus would pay visits to his uncle in Brooklyn Heights, where the two would marvel together at the surrounding New York City architecture. Marcus' uncle would give him books with beautiful pictures of architecture from around the world. "He was really influential early on in my life," Marcus recalled, saying that his uncle sparked his initial interest in architecture. Last Wednesday, Marcus, now a third-year Architecture student, was presented with something much more inspiring than a book: a prestigious Faculty Senate Harrison Undergraduate Research Award. At a ceremony held in the Rotunda's Dome Room, Marcus, along with 26 other undergraduate students and their mentors, was honored for his "outstanding undergraduate research proposal." Marcus' idea for his research proposal stemmed from his interest in a series of essays he read, entitled "Architecture of Fear." The essays detailed the "psychological effects that buildings can have upon people." In light of recent incidents like the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing and the 1998 bombings of U.S.


Life

Odds and Ends

American pie Members of St. Elmo's Hall fraternity mixed a little patriotism into their bid day in a tradition that mixes both new and old. Fraternity members welcomed new pledges with a giant American flag draped across their house, said Shep Campbell, third-year College student and St.


Life

The puck stops here

The Zamboni machine glides across the ice, leaving behind a perfectly smooth surface. After the teams enter, a group of fans bang on the plastic barrier surrounding the rink as the team scores. "Wow!


Life

The need to compete: What does lawnmower racing say about our competitive drive?

Due to popular demand I am presenting you with another sports-related column. (In actuality there was no popular demand unless you count the one faithful reader who requested I set fire to my face). I wanted to devote a little time to the most popular sports in America -- boxing, fishing and lawnmower racing. I actually saw lawnmower racing on some obscure sports channel the other day.


Life

Homecoming

Mark Lindsey held the machine that once kept his heart beating in front of him. "It's unreal that this thing was in me," the former University football lineman said. The LVAD machine operated as an artificial left ventricle: While the machine kept his heart alive for the past six months, it also, through a major defect, once leaked substantial amounts of blood, nearly killing him.


Life

The party's over: Fox cancellations mark end of era in television programming

"Hello," I nervously whispered into the receiver. "Kate, you won't believe what's happened!" an agitated female voice cried. It took me a minute to realize that the caller was my friend Lisa who goes to school several states away. "What's wrong?" I asked assuming that she'd just broken up with the most recent love of her life. "What's the worst thing that could possibly happen?" she replied. "David broke up with you?" "No, something even worse than that." "You wrecked your car." "Worse." I was getting exasperated.


Life

Odds and Ends

Weekend plans For any 'Hoos who might not spend Sunday recovering from a wild weekend, the Office of Orientation and New Student Programs is sponsoring a free trip to Monticello. "We talk a lot about Thomas Jefferson here," Asst.


Life

Odds and Ends

Dancing for charity Some University students had the chance to help charity and dance the night away at the Winter Ball Saturday.


Life

Facing a 'Smackdown!'

Yes, it was cold in Baltimore that night. But for the thousands of wrestling fans packed into the Baltimore Arena for the World Wrestling Federation's "Smackdown!", there was plenty of heat, thanks to what The Roooooooooccckkkkkk was cooking.


Life

Educating with artifacts

Most University students, faculty and community members pass by a museum every day without even noticing it. Its name is the Virginia Museum of Natural History at the University, and it's one of the University's hidden treasures.


Life

Odds and Ends

Snowed in Students hoping for a ride between Super Bowl parties received no support from the usually dependable Escort Service Sunday night. Phone dispatchers were forced to tell those in need of a ride that the Escort Service was closed due to inclement weather. "All of our vans are rear-wheel drive," University Police Capt.