The Cavalier Daily
Serving the University Community Since 1890

Life


Life

En route to cordless bliss

This week I wanted to bring to your attention an extremely grave situation that in the near future could affect every last one of us.


Life

Odds and Ends

Race Line The voice of the Reverend Al Sharpton came over the University's phone lines Friday with an unexpected question: is race really an issue of concern at the University? Though "The Reverend" was actually Ryan Coleman-Ferebee, director of communications for Brothers United Celebrating Knowledge and Success, his inquiry was met with a resounding yes from the audience at Reflection on Complexion, an open forum for race discussions sponsored by B.U.C.K.S. The event, which marked the culmination of B.U.C.K.S's outreach week, was held in Old Cabell Hall with about 400 people in attendance. A student-created short film opened the event and introduced the format of the discussion: Race Line, which parodied the popular call-in advice show "Love Line." Questions concerned the relevance of the diversity issue on college campuses, affirmative action and non-native English speakers serving on juries. While some panelists were opposed to using race as a factor in admissions, most were in favor of some form of affirmative action. There was more contention over the issue of U.S.


Life

Birthday suits on the Lawn

Streaking is such a pervasive part of the University experience that one often wonders if perhaps Jefferson himself didn't make that notorious sprint down the Lawn while Madison or Washington served as lookouts for the cops. Evidence conflicts as to exactly when the tradition got started - in fact, no one appears to know for certain.


Life

Odds and Ends

Reflecting on race "Can I call you 'nigga" a flyer asks. Brothers United Celebrating Knowledge and Success hope the shock-value of their flyers will encourage anyone enraged or intrigued by racial commentary to attend Reflection on Complexion, an open forum for race discussions today at 8 p.m.


Life

Odds and Ends

Dawgy style The first sign of spring has arrived. And, no, it wasn't the sighting of a robin or the budding of daffodils that signaled the start of this new season. Dawg Days at the Castle have begun. Every Thursday from 11 a.m.


Life

Natural Bridge awes with beauty, history

This is the second in a weekly series of articles on road trips within reasonable reach of the University. George Washington carved his initials in it, Thomas Jefferson once owned it, and a Virginia county takes its name after it.


Life

Odds and Ends

Personal issues Wednesday marks the Mosaic House spring forum, which will concentrate on religious issues throughout the University. "We want to take this kind of taboo subject away from closed-mindedness and to make people feel more comfortable talking about it," said Tracy D'Souza, second-year College student and forum planner. Panelists will include members from groups such as Inter-Varsity Christians and Hillel, as well as individuals holding atheistic and Catholic beliefs. "We wanted to focus on when you come to the University ... how practicing religion changes if it does change," she said. The forum will take place in Maury Auditorium at 7:00 p.m.


Life

Students grant children's wishes

Lots of little boys have dreams of becoming police officers. But for 7-year-old leukemia patient Chris Greicius, this dream actually came true.


Life

Odds and Ends

Spring Fling in Full Swing As the blossoms around Grounds begin to creep into full flower, so do many University social events.


Life

Adventures in skiing yield more falls than fruits

Over spring break, while many of you were having the time of your lives in exotic locations where the local dress code is nothing but sand, I was in Colorado trying to kill myself - I mean, learning to ski. Skiing consists of putting an extremely slick piece of graphite on each foot and hurling yourself down an icy mountain while grasping sharp metal poles in your hands.


Life

Inequality in pornography?

The cashier with green press-on nails and wispy blonde hair looks up shyly when asked whether Lucky Seven regularly stocks Playgirls. "We usually sell out of Playgirl pretty quick.


Life

Waltzing in time

Those students looking to dance the night away Saturday at the Restoration Ball may not realize they are prep-stepping in the footsteps of a centuries-old tradition. This Restoration Ball, co-sponsored by the Jefferson Literary and Debating Society and the University Guide Service, carries on a long tradition of year-end dances that stretches back to the earliest years of University history. "The Ball is a really unique event in that it is open to the entire University community," said Rebecca Crawford, the 2000 Restoration Ball Chairwoman and third-year College student. According to a 1964 edition of The Cavalier Daily, the Restoration Ball began in 1964 as a means of raising funds for the restoration of the Rotunda and as a way of carrying on the 19th-century custom of a Finals Ball. After a fire destroyed the Rotunda in 1895, architect Stanford White restored the former library in 1898, dramatically changing its original interior design, University Historian Raymond Bice said. White removed the entire second floor to create one large room for the library, often called the "cavern of books" in later years.