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Ackerly addresses student diversity

University Rector John P. Ackerly III emphasized the Board of Visitors strong support of diversity in admissions while addressing an overflowing crowd in Jefferson Hall last night. Over 150 students attended Ackerly's speech, which was sponsored by the Jefferson Literary and Debating Society. Ackerly discussed several issues he declared "important to the University," but the continuing debate over the use of race as a factor in admissions dominated the discussion. Ackerly said the Board fears lawsuits over its current admissions policies, but is "committed to maintaining diversity," and is unanimous in its support for maintaining a diverse student body. The University's admissions policy is "legal and defensible in court," he said. Saturday, the Virginia State Conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People demanded Board member Terence P.


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City supports admissions policy

Charlottesville officials said they soon will propose a resolution urging the University to maintain its affirmative action program - emphasizing how the University's current policy impacts the city. The resolution, written by City Councilman Maurice Cox and Mayor Virginia Daugherty, will be voted on at the Oct.


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University forms computer plan

An increasing number of colleges and universities are setting higher standards of computer literacy for students, and the University also is taking steps to achieve that goal. University President John T.


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Judiciary Committee plans to keep statistics

The University Judiciary Committee plans to have a system in place by next semester that will allow them to track the number and types of cases that go through the system. While the Committee kept case files, it did not have a policy for distributing statistics to the public because they rarely received requests for the data. "When people ask for statistics we give them an estimate for [the cost of] compiling the statistics" and allow them to decide whether or not to gather the data, Committee Chairman Brian Hudak said. But now, Committee members said they hope a statistical database will allow them to analyze what types of cases go through the system and better educate the community.


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Scrapbooks shed light on Jefferson

The recent discovery of Thomas Jefferson's personal scrapbooks at Alderman Library reveals the sentimental side of his complex personality. The four-volume scrapbook -- composed of clippings pasted to hand-made envelopes -- includes political items, scientific information and even romantic poetry.


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DNA fingerprinting gives strong evidence in cases

Police are hoping that DNA fingerprinting will help bring them one step closer to identifying a suspect in the Venable area rape case that shook the University community last month. DNA evidence from the crime scene is being compared to DNA profiles from all of the databanks in the United States.


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Atkins diet prompts health concerns

The '80s were the beginning of the big fitness craze in America. Around the time of the fitness boom came Dr. Robert Atkins, a cardiologist who graduated from Cornell Medical School.


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High school student arrested for vandalism

Shortly before Monticello High School students were dismissed Tuesday afternoon, Albemarle County Police arrested a student who confessed to vandalizing the school with racist graffiti. The 17-year-old student, a white male, is a senior who attends the high school.


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Urinary study shows depression connection

Babies aren't the only ones - 30 million American adults wear diapers. But it's no laughing matter. Incontinence affects one out of three Americans over the age of 60 and costs $17 billion every year to treat. Researchers in the University Medical Center's Urology Department are working to understand the probable causes and treatments of the disorder. Properly defined, urinary incontinence is the uncontrollable urine loss of a sufficient magnitude to comprise a hygienic problem for the sufferer. Dr. William Steers, chairman of the Urology Department, co-authored the results of a new study published this summer, which says that low levels of serotonin, a brain chemical, may be the reason behind this often embarrassing and restricting problem. Urinary incontinence exists in three forms, categorized by their causes: stress incontinence, which is attributed to obesity and physical exertion; urge incontinence, which is characterized by an overactive bladder; and mixed stress/urge, which has symptoms of both types.


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Casteen addresses admissions

In an open letter to the University community released last night, University President John T. Casteen III emphasized the necessity of maintaining equal opportunity in admissions. The letter, which was released to The Cavalier Daily, details from a historical perspective Casteen's analysis of considering race as a factor in admissions. "Alongside other Virginia colleges and universities, we have worked over the years to remedy the brutal and specific costs ... of Virginia's history of racial segregation," Casteen said in the letter. Although the University "operates within the rule of law," he said, one of the problems is that "no one is confident now what the law is." Casteen, who was formerly the University's dean of admissions, said race is not the definitive criterion when admitting students and noted that SAT scores or grade-point-averages are not the only measures of success. Earlier this month, University Board of Visitors member Terence P.


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Neurology receives $5.7 million of federal grant

University doctors and researchers may soon understand more about the causes of Parkinson's Disease, thanks to a $5.7 million federal grant awarded to the University Health System yesterday. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a division of the National Institute of Health, awarded a total of $49 million in federal funding to eight schools for Parkinson's research. The Health System will use its five-year grant to further investigate abnormalities in cell mitochondria, an area in which it already has conducted extensive research. "Working out the specifics of the mitochondrial genetic abnormalities and the mechanisms of how cells die [or survive] that contain the abnormal mitochondrial genes is the scientific thrust of our research program," said Dr. James P.