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Gore discusses life, campaign with students

Gore, the wife of Al Gore - vice president and democratic presidential candidate - said her husband "is the guy who's perfect to be the next president." Gore met with about 10 students at the Corner's Espresso Royale coffeehouse, drank a hot café mocha and fielded questions about campaigning, affirmative action and the 2000 presidential election. Responding to a question about the recent debate surrounding the use of race as a factor in the University's admissions process, she said she did not know all of the details but said she and her husband strongly support affirmative action. She added that while she is campaigning, her husband's bid for the presidency is her main focus, but that her family must always find a balance between campaigning and family life. "The pressures are enormous," Gore said.


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Litigation influences admissions

Recent scrutiny over the use of racial factors in the University's admissions process reflects a larger national phenomenon -- the trend to adjust current affirmative action policies to dodge lawsuits, say university administrators across the nation. The effect has been an adverse one, with the intellectual environment challenged and minority enrollment even dropping at some schools, said officials at several of the University's peer institutions in interviews with The Cavalier Daily. These universities include James Madison University, the University of Michigan, the University of Texas-Austin, the University of California-Berkeley and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Despite the legacy of 1978's historic Supreme Court decision, The Regents of the University of California v.


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Pundits discuss Goode's affiliation

A Republican takeover of the General Assembly in this fall's elections may put pressure on U.S. Congressman Virgil Goode (D-5th) to switch political parties. Goode's conservative voting record often has set him against his party's position.


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Police investigate Phi

Charlottesville Police and University officials are investigating a Sept. 16 allegation of illegal hazing of second-year Engineering student John W.


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University of Richmond football player drowns

University of Richmond freshman Donnie Lindsey Jr. of Annandale, Va., drowned after jumping into Westhampton Lake in the middle of campus with other freshmen Sunday night. Lindsey, a Richmond Spiders football player, and other students were walking back from an induction ceremony called Freshman Investiture.


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College Board launches for-profit Web site

The non-profit College Board, administrator of the Scholastic Aptitude Test, is tackling its first for-profit subsidiary ever--creating a commercial Web site in an effort to stay competitive with the growing multitude of online commercial SAT-prep courses.


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County school vandalized by racist graffiti

"Monticello Loves to Hate" was among the racist and threatening statements spray-painted on the large sidewalk in front of Monticello High School's central entrance early yesterday morning. According to Albemarle County Police Sgt.


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Charlottesville seeks relief from traffic woes to attract residents

(This is the third in a three-part series about Charlottesville's efforts to attract middle-income residents.) Charlottesville is no stranger to parking and transportation woes, and city officials are worried that these problems are hurting city residents' quality of life. The city aims to improve public transportation and create a more pedestrian-friendly environment to attract middle-income residents.


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Program educates youths about politics

In an attempt to promote civic participation among young people, the University's Center for Governmental Studies is undertaking a Youth Leadership Initiative, which aims to educate school-age children about politics. To do so, the Initiative will use a citizenship curriculum, annual online mock elections and student-candidate debates. Larry J.


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Harrison gives $10 million for institute

University alumnus David A. Harrison III donated $10 million last week to Alderman Library. The funds will establish an institute for American studies, where students and faculty will be able to view such relics of American history as the first Bible published in the New World and the first printing of the Declaration of Independence. In the past, Harrison has pledged millions in gifts to the School of Law, the School of Medicine, the College and athletics.


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U.S. Circuit Court judgment on using race in admissions raises further legal inquiries

A ruling by a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court Friday declared unconstitutional an admissions policy using race as a factor, sparking yet another round of legal wrangling among University leaders. The decision declared an Arlington County, Va., kindergarten magnet school's lottery system that gives preference to black and Hispanic applicants unconstitutional. Board of Visitors member Terence P.


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DNC chair calls for urban renewal

The outcome of national elections in 2000 will greatly impact the future of America's struggling cities by influencing how much of the Federal surplus will be spent on revitalizing urban areas, Democratic National Committee Chairman Ed Rendell said in a speech before the Jefferson Literary and Debating Society Friday night.


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A cappella : music success through business

A cappella groups long have been a tradition at the University. Singing is what they do best, but it also takes a business-savvy mind to run these groups smoothly. Each a cappella group on Grounds has a business manager who is in charge of all monetary transactions, publicity and promotional matters. Mark Manley, outgoing business manager for the Academical Village People, described his job as being "an accountant for the group.


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Lafley gives P&G perspective to students

Seeing throngs of well-dressed students on Grounds doesn't always mean that there is a home football game -- especially since recruiting sessions have started. On Tuesday, almost 300 students filled the Wilson Hall auditorium to hear speaker Alan G.


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Students seek aid for friends struggling with Taiwan earthquake

Disaster struck Taiwan in the form of an earthquake Tuesday and now the Chinese Student Association is rallying to raise aid for survivors. The earthquake, which registered a 7.6 on the Richter scale, left at least 2,000 dead. Lily Lin, third-year Commerce student and CSA treasurer, said after hearing about the earthquake, she began to organize fundraising efforts for the victims. "Hopefully the University community will be supportive," Lin said. Yesterday the CSA set up a table at Newcomb Hall and plans to go to the Lawn as part of their fundraising efforts, said Dan Wong, fourth-year Engineering student and CSA secretary. Tonight the CSA will be collecting for earthquake relief at the Full Moon Festival at Newcomb Hall, Lin said. The CSA plans to continue efforts throughout next week, Wong said. Asst.