The Cavalier Daily
Serving the University Community Since 1890

News


News

Panelists discuss future of world affairs

About 100 students listened as representatives from seven student organizations debated whether the United States has political, social, moral and economic obligations to developing nations last night in Wilson Hall. Robert Fatton, government and foreign affairs department chair, moderated the panel, which was sponsored by the International Relations Organization.


News

Deans renew FOA contract with Phi Psi

Phi Kappa Psi fraternity re-joined the Inter-Fraternity Council and re-established a formal relationship with the University yesterday after the Office of the Dean of Students officially reinstated the fraternity's Fraternal Organization Agreement. Phi Psi lost IFC recognition April 10 after five pledges were arrested Feb.


News

OAAA faculty mentorship faces dearth of minority participation

Minority University students have an opportunity available for interaction with faculty members -- but few have taken advantage of it. The Faculty-Student Mentoring Program, run by the Office of African-American Affairs, offers black, Latino, Asian and Native American students the chance to have a personal relationship with faculty members and administrators. Peter Yu, assistant dean in the Office of African-American Affairs, said while the program has been in existence for five years, it is being underutilized. Fifty students now are involved in the program, Yu said, and nearly 100 faculty and administrators want to participate as mentors. He said the OAAA now is working to try to attract more minority students to the program. "We're trying to get more students involved," he said, adding that the office has stepped up its publicity efforts for the program this semester. Dean of Students Penny Rue said that, although she has not been assigned a student to mentor, she has had "good conversations" with students who are part of the program. Part of the reason students are not fully utilizing the program is that they are "hesitant to put themselves forward" and join it, Rue said. Students need to "get the chutzpah to do it," she said. Faculty Senate Chairman David T.


News

Alumni Association reports more student members

Students are joining the Alumni Association before they graduate at higher rates than in past years thanks to an ongoing effort by the organization to increase its membership by offering more tangible benefits to members. Current students can join the Association as a Student Life Member while still enrolled at the University if they commit to paying a membership fee either before or after graduation.


News

Student assaulted at Kappa Sigma

A male student was physically assaulted by a non-student during a private party in the Kappa Sigma fraternity house early Sunday morning. According to University Police, there were two victims, a student and a non-student, and Police said they believe there may also have been a second attacker involved, Police Captain Purcell McCue said. Both victims decided not to press charges, McCue said. Police responded to a call and arrived at the scene at about 1:04 a.m. "We got the call that there was a subject [at the party] with a gun, but when we got there we couldn't find any," McCue said.


News

Casteen supports diversity in State of University speech

During his State of the University address Saturday morning, University President John T. Casteen III reiterated his support for the use of race in admissions and also addressed other issues now facing the University. About 500 parents, students, faculty members and administrators crowded into Old Cabell Hall to hear Casteen speak.


News

IAPC to focus on

According to University President John T. Casteen III, only about 15 percent of University students study abroad - a number the International Activities Planning Commission is trying to increase. "There is something fundamental about studying in another culture," Casteen said at his State of the University address Saturday. This is the philosophy of the International Activities Planning Commission, said Julie Novak, a Nursing school professor and member of the Commission's Faculty and Study Abroad Task Group. The Commission is one of the major facets of Virginia 2020, a long range University-wide agenda designed to perpetuate the success of the University into the 21st century. But the percentage of University students studying abroad is average among national colleges and universities, Development Services Director Julian Bivins said. Compared to percentages of the University's peer institutions, the numbers appear more disparaging, said Melissa Bowles, Spanish professor and Commission member. Forty-five percent of the students at Duke study abroad, Bowles said. The possible benefits of increasing percentages, however, transcend impressing the competition, she said. It is important "students study abroad, that [we] create a student body more aware of what's going on - not just in Charlottesville and U.Va.


News

City law outlines residential occupancy rules

Three is company, four is a crowd, and five is illegal. Students looking for off-Grounds housing should be aware of a Charlottesville ordinance that prohibits more than four unrelated people from living in a single housing unit. Charlottesville Planning Manager Ron Higgins said about half a dozen cases are brought up each year, but usually the landlord settles the complaint before court action is needed. City Councilman Blake Caravati said the landlord could choose to evict tenants to bring the total of unrelated people to four or less. Should a case go to court, fines for violating this zoning ordinance range from $100 to $1,000 and the property owner or landlord and not the tenant would be considered at fault, Higgins said. City Councilman David Toscano said the ordinance is designed to prevent certain neighborhoods from becoming too dense. University students violate the ordinance the most, Toscano said. "I don't know of a case where students weren't involved," he said. Higgins said almost every community is concerned about overcrowding, which is why Charlottesville adopted the law. But Charlottesville officials do not enforce the ordinance very often. Caravati said the enforcement is generally complaint-driven, but sometimes officials sweep through neighborhoods to find violators.


News

Faculty work for Judaic major

University students who are interested in Judaic Studies may be in luck in the near future. A new interdisciplinary program in Judaic Studies may become a part of the University's offerings if the College administration approves the program in January 2000. The program originated a few years ago when College Dean Melvyn P.


News

Pappas advocates network marketing

Last Wednesday, American Communications Network representative Jason Pappas discussed his company and the network marketing industry to members of the McIntire Investment Institute.


News

UJC clears Honor member of abusing Committee position

The University Judiciary Committee found a member of last year's Honor Executive Committee not guilty of violating Standard 11, which prohibits breeches of confidentiality and obstructing the operations of the Honor and Judiciary Committees. Although the student was not found guilty in a UJC trial Oct.


News

University chosen to manage lab

The University is one of six schools that has been asked to help manage the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility in Tennessee. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a multi-program science and technology laboratory managed for the U.S.


News

City cracks down on selling parking near Scott Stadium

Several residents near Scott Stadium sell parking spaces in their yards and driveways during home football games, a practice which Charlottesville officials are hoping to stop. After issuing verbal warnings to about six residents at the last home football game Oct.


News

Bayly gala kicks off Film Festival

Last night, students, professors and filmmakers alike celebrated the art of artifice as the 12th Annual Virginia Film Festival commenced. In a departure from the more introspective themes of the past, this year's Festival honors "TechnoVision." The selections recognize the many innovations being made in the world of film technology today, while also looking back at the influence of changing technology throughout film history. One of the guests at last night's opening gala, held at the Bayly Art Museum, was Academy Award-winning makeup and visual effects expert Stan Winston, a 1968 University graduate. When asked about his support for the University's Capital Campaign fund-raising drive, Winston said, "One of the reasons I'm here and one of the reasons that I've been involved in the Arts Council is ... so that the fine art and performing arts programs at Virginia could be stronger." Winston said that in the past he could not recommend the university to people eager to follow his career path. "Now I will be able to recommend Virginia because there is so much energy in bringing the arts of this school up to the standard of the rest of the school," he said. Joining Winston last night at the Festival was three-time Oscar nominee Sigourney Weaver, who has worked with Winston on her upcoming film "Galaxy Quest" as well as in "Aliens," which is to be shown this weekend at the Festival. "Stan is a good friend and wonderful at what he does," she said in an interview with The Cavalier Daily.


News

EPA recommends financial penalty for oil-spill violations

The Environmental Protection Agency has recommended a $29,989 fine against the University for violating environmental regulations on oil-spill prevention plans. The EPA announcement, which came Wednesday, also cited Lincoln University and Villanova University for similar violations. The University has 20 aboveground oil and gasoline tanks on Grounds used for heating and various other services. Ralph Allen, director of the University's Environmental Health and Safety office, said the EPA's fine occurred because the University's oil spill prevention plans are not specific enough for the EPA's requirements. Facilities Management and Allen's office will work together in drawing up a plan that will comply with the law. But this is not an easy task, Allen said, and "will take significant time and effort." The EPA's enforcement office for Region III has made it a goal to examine institutions of higher education and see whether they follow environmental laws, EPA spokeswoman Ruth Podems said. "Usually we target inspections at different sectors," such as industrial corporations, Podems said, but the EPA has "never targeted universities before." The figure of $29,989 is the estimated benefit the University has accrued by not having the proper plans required by the EPA, she said. Podems stressed that the fine is only a proposal, as the University and the EPA could agree on a settlement amount that is lower than the original amount. The regulations calling for specific oil spill prevention plans are not new ones.


News

Brown heater roasts pet turtle

Tragedy struck in Brown College over Fall Break as temperatures within the dorm complex soared to a hellish 115 degrees when a heating component failed, melting posters off walls, ruining foodstuffs, and smiting one resident, Ronin - Ronin the turtle. Corrie Hall, third-year College student and Brown College resident, returned to her room after Fall Break to find Ronin, her amphibious companion of two years, floating face up in his terrarium. "My pet ... turtle suffered a cruel and inhumane death.