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Thief nabs Booker House computers

Upon arriving at the Booker House yesterday morning, public relations employees found that several pieces of computer and office equipment, valued at $32,135.19, were missing from the Madison Lane office. The Booker House accommodates the University's public relations services including Community Relations, News Service, State Government Relations, and University Relations offices. According to University Police Lt.


News

Study indicates dorm choice along race lines

Alderman Road dormitories attract a more racially diverse student body than McCormick Road dormitories, according to statistics compiled by the University's Office of Institutional Assessment and Studies obtained by The Cavalier Daily. This year, 1,393 first-year students live in Alderman Road dormitories.


News

Council appoints liaisons to work with student groups

In an attempt to improve relations between Student Council and the University community, Council has implemented a plan to send student liaisons to various student organizations as well as to the Board of Visitors and the Faculty Senate. The liaison system was created over the summer by a team of Council Executive Board members, who include Council President Taz Turner, Vice President for Administration Brock Jolly and Communications Director Brooke Brower.


News

Rue, organizations plan to re-establish walking escorts

Recent violence in the Charlottesville area, including an armed rape last month, and increased use of the University Escort Service, has prompted several student groups to take initial steps to reinstate the Student Watch Service. The Student Watch Service, a student-run organization that provides volunteer walking escorts, did not renew its status as a Contracted Independent Organization this fall, Student Council College Rep.


News

University faculty members may face challenging road to tenure

(This is the first of a two-part series about the faculty tenure process.) For the most part, University students are familiar with the word tenure and know that it somehow applies to some of their professors, but are unaware of exactly how difficult it can be to obtain. Economics Prof.


News

City seeks to increase middle-class housing

(This is the second part in a three part series about Charlottesville's efforts to attract middle-income residents.) Attracting middle income residents and creating new homes go hand in hand, said Charlottesville officials as they continue efforts to increase available city housing. City officials are now considering large and small parcels of land throughout the town for residential development. "We need to create more choices for people," City Councilman David Toscano said. City Council already has heard preliminary plans for the construction of the Wrenson Development Park, which would create about 120 residential units on the site of a former sewage treatment plant.


News

U. Police report fewer alcohol-related arrests

According to University Police statistics on alcohol-related incidents released yesterday, four University students have been arrested for alcohol violations in the last three weeks, but several more have been referred to the University administration for violations of alcohol policy. University Police Lt.


News

Lambeth stairs break apart beneath student

Lambeth Field residents received a jolt yesterday as a chunk of concrete fell from a flight of stairs in apartment building 467. Third-year College student Seth Evans said he was carrying laundry down the stairs from his second floor suite as the stair gave way underfoot. Evans, who was not injured, said his front foot was one step below, thus keeping him from falling with the stair.


News

IFC, Rue discuss rush dates

Members of the Inter-Fraternity Council Executive Board met Friday with Dean of Students Penny Rue to discuss several issues now facing the fraternity system, including the effects of deferred rush on fraternity houses. IFC President Wes Kaupinen said he asked Rue whether rush dates were negotiable and how administrators would address the financial damages incurred by fraternities because of spring rush. Rue said she plans to evaluate the effects of spring rush on the fraternity system and the University community for several years before drawing a conclusion about rush dates. "There was a broad consensus among the University community to move rush, and it will take several years to determine whether [the move] is doing what the institution intended it to," she said. But Kaupinen said while the benefits of deferred rush remain to be seen, the benefits of fraternity membership are far-reaching. "There is concrete evidence that fraternity members and the structure and ideals of the fraternity system have repeatedly led to achievement at the University," he said.


News

Policy evokes legal questions

In light of recent debates over using race as a factor in the admissions process, University faculty members and administrators are trying to weigh the legal aspects and court precedents governing the issue. Although Board of Visitors member Terence P.


News

2020 commissions plan for panels

Beginning with a conference on Science and Technology, Project Virginia 2020 officials will conduct a series of forums aimed at exposing the University to the ideas and advances achieved by other educational institutions. Last fall, University President John T.


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Media center unites student resources

With the opening of the Robertson Media Center in Clemons Library this week, students are one step closer to being able to major in media studies. Media Center Director Rick Provine said there already is "tremendous interest" in the Center, and the facility will "create an environment more conducive to the study of media." The Center, which is located on the third floor of Clemons Library, will consolidate the library's media resources into one floor.


News

State vote approves parkway

The Meadowcreek Parkway now is one step closer to becoming a reality. The Commonwealth Transportation Board approved the Parkway Wednesday, taking recommendations from Charlottesville, Albemarle County and the Virginia Department of Transportation. The Meadowcreek Parkway will be a two-mile road connecting Rio Road and the Route 250 Bypass.