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Life


Life

College secrets revealed: Pay attention first years

Well, summer is coming to an end. Months of carefree frolicking, staying out all night and working an incredibly boring, meaningless job so that you can have enough spare money to afford midnight pizza deliveries at college are almost over. It is time to get ready to leave the comfort of your home to become a part of something much bigger, encompassing several miles and thousands of students, although your actual dorm room may be no larger than a big screen TV. I'm sure many questions are running through your head.


Life

For sandwiches, try Taking lunch Away

Take It Away proves that you can take more than sandwiches away from lunch: you can take a good overall lunch experience as well. The restaurant, which opened its doors seven years ago, offers classy sandwiches, homemade salads and a wide array of desserts.


Life

Coming home again

Welcome home. Well, it's not your home yet, but it will be soon, despite your parents' wishes to the contrary.


Life

'Hoos in Hooville' looks at Wahoo past

The current special collections exhibit begs the question, how much 'hoo is in your wahoo? A piece in the show offers one way to answer: the poster reads, "If you had your life to live over again, would you still fall in love with yourself?" and "Are you a candidate for the Alcohol of Fame?" The quiz is part of "All the Hoos in Hooville: 175 Years of Life at the University of Virginia," a special collections exhibit running through Oct.


Life

Odds & Ends

Street wise Charlottesville may not offer the most urban of scenes, but a recent exhibit at the Bayly Art Museum offers a look into street photography. "Forever in Search: Urban Street Photography in the Twentieth Century" began with a donation, Bayly curator Stephen Margulies said.


Life

Big adventures in Peru

LIMA, PERU--The guy behind me at the Lima airport baggage claim had warned me. "You just can't plan for anything in South America," he said. He shared these words of wisdom in the midst of a mini airport crisis: The Lost Suitcase. The situation snowballed as we learned that not one but every single piece of luggage on my flight had been left behind in Atlanta, leaving myself and fellow passengers clueless, baggage-less and clean underwear-less for four days. This was my first lesson in Peruvian unpredictability. The subsequent lessons have proved less harsh--and more hygienic--the most important of which has been unlearning seven years of textbook Spanish. There's a big difference between drooling over novels like Gabriel Garcia Marquez's "One Hundred Years of Solitude" and actually living its magical realism in the crowded, crazy streets of Lima, where Peru's rich history oozes out of every eclectic storefront and every crumbling colonial mansion. In the first two weeks I have been here, I have seen things I have never seen before. The brown-clad guards decked in bullet proof vests and army boots hold tight to their automatic weapons and stand as stoic as ancient Incas.


Life

Apple pie America takes on London

The first thing you're warned about is the weather--vast amounts of rain, an average 60 degrees in summer, and, of course, fog--London Fog. Studying abroad in London for a month was a way for me get out of Virginia, but the class I was taking--the Culture of London--also ensured that I would get a first class non-stop tour through the highways and byways of one of the most culturally distinguished cities in Europe. Of course, the first lesson I learned is that it's foggy only when your plane is about to land.


Life

Odds & Ends

Answer: "The only college campus to host Jeopardy! auditions this fall." Question: "What is the University of Virginia?" That's right, the University won Sony's College Jeopardy!


Life

Culture-shocked student experiences Peruvian culture

LIMA, PERU--The guy behind me at the Lima airport baggage claim had warned me. "You just can't plan for anything in South America," he said. He shared these words of wisdom in the midst of a mini airport crisis: The Lost Suitcase. The situation snowballed as we learned that not one but every single piece of luggage on my flight had been left behind in Atlanta, leaving myself and fellow passengers clueless, baggage-less and clean underwear-less for four days. This was my first lesson in Peruvian unpredictability. The subsequent lessons have proved less harsh--and more hygenic--the most important of which has been un-learning seven years of textbook Spanish. There's a big difference between drooling over novels like Gabriel Garcia Marquez' "One Hundred Years of Solitude" and actually living its magical realism in the crowded, crazy streets of Lima where Peru's rich history oozes out of every eclectic store front and every crumbling colonial mansion. In the mere two weeks I have been here, I have seen things I have never seen before. The brown-clad guards decked in bullet proof vests and army boots hold tight to their automatic weapons and stand as stoic as ancient Incas.


Life

A more mature Sandler tests fatherly charm in mediocre 'Big Daddy'

He's ba-aaaaaack. Only this time, he's grown up. Well, okay, just a little bit. He is Adam Sandler, whose bag of man-child schtick has turned him into one of Hollywood's $20 million-men, emerging in his fifth leading role in "Big Daddy." Unsurprisingly, there is not a whole lot of ingenuity to be found here, but Sandler fans should nonetheless walk away feeling satisfied.